Shankar Vedantam http://www.kunc.org en Research: Americans Less Fearful Of Storms With Female Names http://www.kunc.org/post/research-americans-less-fearful-storms-female-names A new analysis suggests unconscious sexism causes people to take hurricanes with female names less seriously than hurricanes with male names. Tue, 03 Jun 2014 09:31:00 +0000 Shankar Vedantam 57317 at http://www.kunc.org What's In A Grunt — Or A Sigh, Or A Sob? Depends On Where You Hear It http://www.kunc.org/post/whats-grunt-or-sigh-or-sob-depends-where-you-hear-it Transcript <p>MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: <p>From NPR news this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.<p>ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: <p>And I'm Robert Siegel. Hear a laugh, you know someone's happy. Hear a sob, you know someone is sad. Or are they? It's been thought that no matter where you live in the world, people express emotions using the same repertoire of sounds. Fri, 30 May 2014 21:05:00 +0000 Shankar Vedantam 57205 at http://www.kunc.org Research: Children Of Judges May Influence Court Decisions http://www.kunc.org/post/research-children-judges-may-influence-court-decisions It's been suspected that judges are swayed by their personal beliefs and affiliations. An analysis found that judges become more likely to rule in "pro-feminist" ways if the judges have daughters. Wed, 28 May 2014 10:40:00 +0000 Shankar Vedantam 57073 at http://www.kunc.org Mating Rituals: Why Certain Risky Behaviors Can Make You Look Hot http://www.kunc.org/post/mating-rituals-why-certain-risky-behaviors-can-make-you-look-hot Social science research suggests risky behavior such as braving heights or swimming in deep waters increases your sex appeal. Driving without a seat belt? Not so much. Wed, 21 May 2014 09:22:00 +0000 Shankar Vedantam 56774 at http://www.kunc.org Why Reporting On Scientific Research May Warp Findings http://www.kunc.org/post/why-reporting-scientific-research-may-warp-findings Transcript <p>DAVID GREENE, HOST: <p>Next we're going to report on scientific research, in particular on the way that reporting on scientific research might actually warp the findings. Scientists face pressure to publish new discoveries, which in turn might influence what they study, and that, of course, is not necessarily a good thing. There's work being published today that's part of an effort to fix this problem. Mon, 19 May 2014 10:36:00 +0000 Shankar Vedantam 56689 at http://www.kunc.org