Susan Stamberg http://www.kunc.org en For Paul Cezanne, An Apple A Day Kept Obscurity Away http://www.kunc.org/post/paul-cezanne-apple-day-kept-obscurity-away Pablo Picasso once said that the great 19th-century French painter Paul Cezanne was "the father of us all." Cezanne's distinctive brush strokes, and the way he distorted perspective and his subjects, influenced the cubists, and most artists who came after him. In Philadelphia, the Barnes Foundation is showing a group of still-life paintings by Cezanne.<p>A few months ago, my neighbor Barbara Baldwin went to the Barnes, which has an incredible collection of pretty much every painting you've ever seen reproduced in art books that's not already at the Met or the Musee d'Orsay in Paris. Thu, 10 Jul 2014 09:01:00 +0000 Susan Stamberg 58736 at http://www.kunc.org For Paul Cezanne, An Apple A Day Kept Obscurity Away Impressionists With Benefits? The Painting Partnership Of Degas And Cassatt http://www.kunc.org/post/impressionists-benefits-painting-partnership-degas-and-cassatt In her novel <em>I Always Loved You</em>, author Robin Oliveira imagines a passionate scene between Edgar Degas — a French artist known for his paintings of dancers — and Mary Cassatt — an American painter known for her scenes of family life. Fri, 23 May 2014 11:16:00 +0000 Susan Stamberg 56889 at http://www.kunc.org Impressionists With Benefits? The Painting Partnership Of Degas And Cassatt One Collector's Plan To Save Realistic Art Was Anything But Abstract http://www.kunc.org/post/one-collectors-plan-save-realistic-art-was-anything-abstract Plenty of collectors want to donate artworks to museums, but the museums don't always welcome them with open arms. "We say 'no thanks' 19 times out of 20," says Betsy Broun, director at the American Art Museum. Sometimes the works aren't museum-quality, other times they don't fit with the museums' philosophy.<p>But in 1986, representatives from the Sara Roby Foundation called the Smithsonian with an offer it couldn't refuse: paintings by Edward Hopper, Raphael Soyer, Reginald Marsh and many more. Mon, 12 May 2014 11:21:00 +0000 Susan Stamberg 56419 at http://www.kunc.org One Collector's Plan To Save Realistic Art Was Anything But Abstract Girls Are Taught To 'Think Pink,' But That Wasn't Always So http://www.kunc.org/post/girls-are-taught-think-pink-wasnt-always-so With sleet, snow and freezing temperatures extending through March, the National Cherry Blossom Festival — which recently kicked off in Washington, D.C. — is decidedly less pink this year. In a few weeks the Tidal Basin will be ringed by rosy, pink blossoms, but until then, we traveled north to Boston, where a show at the Museum of Fine Arts called "<a href="https://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/think-pink" target="_blank">Think Pink</a>" explores the history and social impact of the color.<p>Pink has always been with us, though it was not always as gender-entrenched as it is today. Tue, 01 Apr 2014 12:02:00 +0000 Susan Stamberg 55080 at http://www.kunc.org Girls Are Taught To 'Think Pink,' But That Wasn't Always So Japanese Tea Ritual Turned 15th Century 'Tupperware' Into Art http://www.kunc.org/post/japanese-tea-ritual-turned-15th-century-tupperware-art Eight hundred years ago, tea was rare in Japan. It arrived from China in simple, ceramic storage jars. Chinese ceramists churned these jars out with little care or attention; they stuffed tea leaves into them and shipped them off.<p>The jars were "the Chinese version of Tupperware," says <a href="https://www.princeton.edu/artandarchaeology/faculty/watsky/">Andrew Watsky</a>, a professor of Japanese art history at Princeton.<p>But once the workaday storage jugs reached Japan, they became objects of aesthetic contemplation and, often, reverence. Tue, 18 Mar 2014 09:24:00 +0000 Susan Stamberg 54737 at http://www.kunc.org Japanese Tea Ritual Turned 15th Century 'Tupperware' Into Art