Joseph Shapiro http://www.kunc.org en National Data Confirm Cases Of Restraint And Seclusion In Public Schools http://www.kunc.org/post/national-data-confirm-cases-restraint-and-seclusion-public-schools The practice of secluding or restraining children when they get agitated has long been a controversial practice in public schools. Now, new data show that it's more common than previously understood, happening at least 267,000 times in a recent school year.<p>NPR worked with reporters from the investigative journalism group ProPublica, who compiled data from the U.S. Thu, 19 Jun 2014 11:30:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 57959 at http://www.kunc.org National Data Confirm Cases Of Restraint And Seclusion In Public Schools Facing Doubts About Court Fines, Lawmakers Take Questions To Heart http://www.kunc.org/post/facing-doubts-about-court-fines-lawmakers-take-questions-heart U.S. lawmakers and judges are feeling some urgency to solve the same problem: how to stop sending people to jail simply for failing to pay court fines and fees, often because they're too poor to afford them. Policymakers react to a recent <a href="http://www.npr.org/series/313986316/guilty-and-charged">NPR investigation</a> into the issue. <div class="fullattribution">Copyright 2014 NPR. Wed, 04 Jun 2014 20:08:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 57381 at http://www.kunc.org Measures Aimed At Keeping People Out Of Jail Punish The Poor http://www.kunc.org/post/measures-aimed-keeping-people-out-jail-punish-poor Electronic monitoring devices provide an alternative to sending someone to jail. For a defendant, an ankle bracelet means returning to family and work. For corrections officials, it saves money by reducing overcrowded jails and prisons. Sat, 24 May 2014 20:58:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 56950 at http://www.kunc.org Measures Aimed At Keeping People Out Of Jail Punish The Poor Court Fees Drive Many Poor Defendants Underground http://www.kunc.org/post/court-fees-drive-many-poor-defendants-underground The use of fines and fees charged to criminal defendants has exploded. <a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/05/19/312158516/increasing-court-fees-punish-the-poor">An NPR investigation</a> has found people who can't afford those charges can go to jail for not paying. Hundreds of thousands are hiding from police and the courts. <div class="fullattribution">Copyright 2014 NPR. Wed, 21 May 2014 20:39:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 56804 at http://www.kunc.org Supreme Court Ruling Not Enough To Prevent Debtors Prisons http://www.kunc.org/post/supreme-court-ruling-not-enough-prevent-debtors-prisons Debtors prisons were outlawed in the United States nearly 200 years ago. And more than 30 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court made it clear: Judges cannot send people to jail just because they are too poor to pay their court fines.<p>That decision came in a 1983 case called <em>Bearden v. Georgia</em>, which held that a judge must first consider whether the defendant has the ability to pay but "willfully" refuses.<p>However, the Supreme Court didn't tell courts how to determine what it means to "willfully" not pay. Wed, 21 May 2014 12:06:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 56792 at http://www.kunc.org Supreme Court Ruling Not Enough To Prevent Debtors Prisons