NPR Series: Dumpling Week http://www.kunc.org en The Secret To Making It Through A Yom Kippur Fast? Kreplach http://www.kunc.org/post/secret-making-it-through-yom-kippur-fast-kreplach To mark the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur, the day of atonement, Jews <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129934520">fast</a> from sundown to sundown. But before the sun sets, friends and family gather to enjoy one final meal. And for the Jews of Eastern Europe, that meal traditionally includes kreplach.<p>Kreplach — krepel is the singular — are little dumplings, sometimes known as "Jewish wontons." Like the Chinese dumpling, they're filled with meat, wrapped in dough and added to soup. Fri, 13 Sep 2013 07:05:00 +0000 49544 at http://www.kunc.org The Secret To Making It Through A Yom Kippur Fast? Kreplach Discovering The Small Miracle Of The Soup Dumpling http://www.kunc.org/post/discovering-small-miracle-soup-dumpling The first I ever heard of soup dumplings was 15 years ago in <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/1998/01/16/arts/eating-out-chinese-restaurants.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm">this New York Times story</a>, which described <em>xiao long bao </em>as "the star of the show" at Joe's Shanghai in New York's Chinatown. Sun, 01 Sep 2013 08:58:00 +0000 49064 at http://www.kunc.org Discovering The Small Miracle Of The Soup Dumpling Dumplings Taste Better When Filled With Memories http://www.kunc.org/post/dumplings-taste-better-when-filled-memories Most kids leave Santa cookies. My brother and I would try to bribe him with an extra treat: a couple leftover pierogi from our Christmas Eve dinner.<p>Instead of sugar plums, pierogi danced in my head. And while I never admitted it in my letter to Santa, I was an accomplished pierogi thief. While they were kept warm on the stove ahead of our guests' arrival, I could lift the cover to the pan that cradled them without making a sound, liberating one to scarf down before my Polish mother walked back into the kitchen. Fri, 30 Aug 2013 07:05:00 +0000 48997 at http://www.kunc.org Dumplings Taste Better When Filled With Memories Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings http://www.kunc.org/post/move-over-pot-stickers-china-cooks-hundreds-dumplings All week, we've been talking about dumplings — from tortellini's sensual origins in Italy to <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/28/209894806/you-say-kubbeh-i-say-kibbeh-lets-eat-em-all-right-now">kubbeh's</a> tasty variations in Israel.<p>But perhaps no country has a longer history or greater variety of dumplings than China. Dumplings come in all shapes and with every imaginable filling. Thu, 29 Aug 2013 07:33:00 +0000 Anthony Kuhn 48942 at http://www.kunc.org Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings You Say 'Kubbeh,' I Say 'Kibbeh,' Let's Eat 'Em All Right Now http://www.kunc.org/post/you-say-kubbeh-i-say-kibbeh-lets-eat-em-all-right-now People across the Levant love their dumplings, even if they can't agree on a name. Some say kubbeh; others say kibbeh. In Egypt, you might hear kobeba.<p>In Jerusalem, there are perhaps as many variations of the kubbeh as there are cultures in the city.<p>One popular version consists of meat wrapped in bulgur, then deep fried. Dip one in tahini for a crunchy snack.<p>But at the Te'amim — or Tastes — cooking camp in Jerusalem, chef Udi Shlomi prefers to teach kids to make kubbeh hamusta.<p>"Hamusta, it means <em>hamuts</em>, vinegary ... very lemony kind of a taste," Shlomi says. Wed, 28 Aug 2013 07:33:00 +0000 Emily Harris 48898 at http://www.kunc.org You Say 'Kubbeh,' I Say 'Kibbeh,' Let's Eat 'Em All Right Now