Agriculture http://www.kunc.org en What Goes Into The Price Of Your Tomato? http://www.kunc.org/post/what-goes-price-your-tomato <p>Late summer in the Midwest is tomato season. For tomato growers around that country, it’s time to pick their bounty and calculate their earnings.</p><p> Wed, 20 Aug 2014 11:00:00 +0000 Kristofor Husted & Harvest Public Media 59653 at http://www.kunc.org What Goes Into The Price Of Your Tomato? Squeezing Diesel From A Seed http://www.kunc.org/post/squeezing-diesel-seed <p>On a windy August day outside of Fort Collins, three Colorado State University students crouch in a field, harvesting a crop by hand. The plants in the field, which are browning slower than usual during a wet, cool summer, are a light tan color and about knee high.</p><p>The crop is called camelina, and the researchers believe these plants, which produce tiny, oil-filled seeds, could provide farmers with the ability to grow their own fuel on the farm.</p><p> Wed, 20 Aug 2014 11:00:00 +0000 Stephanie Paige Ogburn 59663 at http://www.kunc.org Squeezing Diesel From A Seed Colorado's Farm To School Takes Root, But Challenges Still Abound http://www.kunc.org/post/colorados-farm-school-takes-root-challenges-still-abound <p>Inside of the Greeley school district's cavernous food services warehouse, nutrition service director Jeremy West leans over a 40-gallon kettle and turns a crank, showing how it tilts for easier access. The pot, empty now, will soon bubble with marinara sauce or maybe burrito filling – with some of those tomatoes or beans coming from farms less than 20 miles away.</p><p>West appreciates those giant pots, but said he wouldn't mind a couple more. Preparing food from scratch takes equipment and space. He's lucky to mostly have the facilities he needs. Many other schools that want to source fresh food from local farmers and ranchers are having a harder time.</p><p> Mon, 18 Aug 2014 11:00:00 +0000 Stephanie Paige Ogburn 59605 at http://www.kunc.org Colorado's Farm To School Takes Root, But Challenges Still Abound Iowa's Corn Farmers Learn To Adapt To Weather Extremes http://www.kunc.org/post/iowas-corn-farmers-learn-adapt-weather-extremes Climate change is creating all kinds of challenges and opportunities for business. One of the sectors that feels the effects most immediately is agriculture. Already, weather patterns are making it more challenging to raise corn — even in Iowa — in the middle of the Corn Belt.<p><a href="http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ilf/content/seth-watkins">Seth Watkins</a> raises corn and cattle in southern Iowa, and he recalls the memorable weather from 2012.<p>"We started out with an extreme drought and then that was topped off by the worst hail storm we've had — ever. Tue, 12 Aug 2014 21:20:00 +0000 John Ydstie 59508 at http://www.kunc.org Iowa's Corn Farmers Learn To Adapt To Weather Extremes Forthcoming Poultry Rules Get Mixed Reception http://www.kunc.org/post/forthcoming-poultry-rules-get-mixed-reception <p>Change is coming to the poultry industry and not everyone is happy about it.</p><p>Until now, inspections have been governed by <a href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/STATUTE-71/pdf/STATUTE-71-Pg441.pdf">a law written in 1957</a>. It’s nine pages long. The <a href="http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/00ffa106-f373-437a-9cf3-6417f289bfc2/2011-0012F.pdf?MOD=AJPERES">new rule</a> — finalized recently by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service — fills 379 pages. Even accounting for differences in font type and size, and formatting, there’s a whole lot more in this one.</p><p> Tue, 12 Aug 2014 11:59:58 +0000 Amy Mayer & Harvest Public Media 59495 at http://www.kunc.org Forthcoming Poultry Rules Get Mixed Reception