News

Stacy Nick / KUNC

There’s a new addition to the Denver Art Museum and it doesn’t require an admission ticket to see it. That’s because it’s outside, where its inviting looks -- and sounds -- attract not just museum visitors, but all sorts of passerby.

On their way into the museum, 7- and 6-year-old sisters Isabelle and Olivia Srodulski stop in the plaza when something unexpected catches their attention.

It’s a row of what looks like beach chairs and they rock back and forth. The girls guess at its purpose.

“It’s like a relaxing seesaw, kind of,” Olivia said. “I think you can sit down and eat your lunch here."

Sandra Fish / KUNC

Democratic gubernatorial candidates demonstrated their early fundraising prowess in reports filed with the Secretary of State Monday, July 17. Nearly $6 million has been raised or loaned in the wide-open race to replace term-limited Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper. 

More than $3 million of that comes from the pockets of Republican businessman Victor Mitchell, who loaned the money to his campaign earlier this year.

Are There Oil And Gas Flowlines In Your Neighborhood?

Jul 18, 2017
KUNC file photo

A one-inch pipeline running just feet below a home in Firestone, Colorado, leaked odorless gas into the basement this spring, causing an explosion that leveled the house. Two people died and another was severely injured.

Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

Democrats in Colorado are withdrawing their voter registrations at a rate five times higher than Republicans. That’s according to data from the Colorado Secretary of State’s office, which maintains voter records. The withdrawals follow news that the state would provide voter information to comply with President Trump’s investigation into voter fraud. 

Film Movement

Moka opens with a woman of about 40 (Emmanuelle Devos) banging her head against a window that faces out onto Lake Geneva from her home in the Swiss city of Lausanne. It’s painful to see, but she doesn’t bang hard enough to damage herself; it’s her vain attempt to vent frustration. Diane has lost something, and soon you figure out it’s her teenaged son, killed by a hit-and-run driver as he came out of a music lesson.

President Trump will hold a press conference with French President Emmanuel Macron from Paris on Thursday morning. Trump is expected to take questions from reporters, the first time he has since news broke of Donald Trump, Jr.'s meeting with a Russian lawyer during the election. 

Story hour at many local bookstores is a time-honored tradition, taking children on far-flung adventures and introducing them to interesting places and characters.

In the backyard of Denver’s Second Star to the Right children’s bookstore, story time is bringing some of those characters to life in a new way.

“Well, hello everyone! How’s everyone doing this morning?” greeted guest reader Shirley Delta Blow to the audience.

Between her white spike heels and the teased-to-the-sky red wig, she’s nearly 7 feet tall. On the tiny stage, she towers over the rows of fidgety kids, who are sitting legs criss-crossed on the lawn.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Donald Trump Jr. tweeted images of emails regarding his 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer on Tuesday. An intermediary said he could connect Trump Jr. with people who had information "that would incriminate Hillary [Clinton]... and would be very useful to your father."

Strand Releasing

The Ornithologist is a bland title for a movie that is anything but. The film may start with a bird watcher, but by the time it ends, you’re looking at a modern telling of the story of St. Anthony of Padua, who died in 1231, and has become known as the patron saint of lost things. And, in fact, the character on screen finds a number of things he’d thought lost.

Jackie Fortier / KUNC

Three years after legalizing recreational marijuana sales in Colorado, lawmakers are turning to pot to fill some gaps in the budget. That’s why lawmakers voted to increase a special use tax on recreational marijuana sales from 10 percent to 15 percent in 2017. But while the money can be a salve for some of Colorado’s problems, it doesn’t -- and can’t -- solve them all.

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