12:01am

Mon June 20, 2011
Your Health

Why Seeing (The Unexpected) Is Often Not Believing

Union College psychology professor Chris Chabris and his students staged an outdoor fight to study inattentional blindness.
Matt Milless Union College

Two months ago, on a wooded path in upstate New York, a psychologist named Chris Chabris strapped a video camera to a 20-year-old man and told him to chase after a jogger making his way down the path.

For close to two years Chabris, who teaches at Union College, had been conducting this same experiment. He did the experiment at night, in the afternoon, with women, with men. All were told to run after the jogger and watch him.

The goal of all this was to answer a question: Is it possible to see something really, really obvious and not perceive it?

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12:01am

Mon June 20, 2011
China: Beyond Borders

Indians Uneasy As China Builds Ports Nearby

Workers unload cargo from the first vessel to enter the Chinese-funded port in Hambantota, Sri Lanka, in November 2010. China's Export-Import Bank provided 85 percent of the financing for construction of the port.
Ishara S. Kodikara AFP/Getty Images

This month, NPR is examining the many ways China is expanding its reach in the world — through investments, infrastructure, military power and more.

As China flexes its economic and military muscle, it's bumping elbows with Asia's other big and fast-growing power: India.

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12:01am

Mon June 20, 2011
Digital Life

Apps That Let You Share Cars, Photos And Money

The Getaround app (above) lets users rent personal cars from other members. The photo-sharing service Path (below) allows its users to have a maximum of 50 friends.
Getaround

The first in an occasional series on mobile apps.

Smartphone apps let us play games, count calories, find cheap gas — just about anything developers can dream up. And the app market is growing quickly. Last month, Apple hit a milestone of 500,000 apps for sale. Competitor Google has more than 200,000 in the Android marketplace.

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12:01am

Mon June 20, 2011
China: Beyond Borders

China's Growing Military Muscle: A Looming Threat?

Stonecutters Island army base in Hong Kong opens to the public once a year as a goodwill gesture. Displays include kung fu demonstrations and shows of knife-fighting skills.
Louisa Lim NPR

This month, NPR is examining the many ways China is expanding its reach in the world — through investments, infrastructure, military power and more.

At the Stonecutters Island army base in Hong Kong, camouflage-clad Chinese soldiers lunge forward with fierce yells, making stabbing motions with their daggers. There's a communal shout of admiration from the crowd watching the display on the army's home territory, which is opened up once a year to the public as a goodwill gesture.

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4:54pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Education

Fact Is, Students Have Never Known History

In a recent nationwide test, only 20% of 4th graders tested 'proficient' in history. (GETTY IMAGES)
George Marks Getty Images

"The test called upon the students to identify at least two of the contributions to the political, economic, or social developments of the United States by such famous Americans as Lincoln, Jefferson, Jackson, and Theodore Roosevelt," an article in The New York Times reports. "Only 22 percent of American students had mastered enough history in their high school days to identify two contributions made by Lincoln to this country."

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4:36pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Author Interviews

How Gold Turned The Yukon Into The Wild West

Nineteenth-century prospectors pan for gold in the Klondike region of Canada's Yukon Territory.
Hulton Archive/Getty

More than a century ago, George Carmack stuck his arm into the frigid waters of Bonanza Creek in the Yukon Valley. What he came up with changed his life and many others: a gold nugget as big as his thumb.

After decades of searching, he was suddenly a rich man. And soon, the frozen, deserted Yukon was overrun. Hundreds of thousands of gold prospectors trekked to Alaska and Canada for the biggest gold strike in American history.

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4:36pm

Sun June 19, 2011
News

9/11 Hate-Crime Victim Seeks To Save His Attacker

Rais Bhuiyan after he was shot in the face on Sept. 21, 2001.
Photo courtesy of Rais Bhuiyan

Just 10 days after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Rais Bhuiyan was working at a gas station in Dallas when he was shot in the face by a man named Mark Stroman.

Stroman was on a shooting spree, targeting people who appeared to be Muslim or of Middle Eastern descent. Stroman is due to be executed July 20; Bhuiyan, the only survivor of the attacks, is fighting to save his life.

When Stroman entered the gas station, Bhuiyan initially thought it was a routine robbery.

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3:41pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Health

A County Triumphs Over Prescription 'Pill Mills'

Portsmouth Public Health Nurse Lisa Roberts helped found the Scioto County Prescription Drug Action Team. Behind her is a memorial to victims of prescription drug abuse.
Noah Adams NPR

Ohio's pain management clinics come under tough new regulations Sunday. Many of the clinics are blamed for prescription drug abuse in a state where the leading cause of accidental death is unintentional drug overdose. In the south of the state, Scioto County is leading the fight against the so-called "pill mills."

Anybody you talk to around the city of Portsmouth can tell you about a family member, a teammate or a colleague who's been in trouble with painkillers.

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2:18pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Children's Books

Bedtime Stories, From A Dad In Afghanistan

iStockPhoto iStockPhoto.com

Karri Bielwicz was five months pregnant when she found out her husband, Ken, was going to be sent to Afghanistan for a year.

She scoured the Web and various military sources for ideas on how to keep their marriage going and how to keep him a constant presence in the life of their daughter, Abigail.

"A lot of the literature suggested that he read books, just to hear his voice," she tells NPR. "We made the decision to have Ken read to a camera five storybooks for Abigail."

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12:43pm

Sun June 19, 2011
Music Interviews

Cults Leave Internet Hype Behind For The Big Time

Cults.
courtesy of the artist

Last year, Cults was just a couple of amateur musicians named Brian Oblivion and Madeline Follin. Then they uploaded their song, "Go Outside," onto a popular indie music website. The tune went viral and they became an instant indie success story. But no one knew who they were, where they were from, what they looked like or, for that matter, their real names.

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