12:01am

Thu June 9, 2011
Sports

'Livestrong' Stadium Tries To Dodge Doping Drama

Construction crews hang the Livestrong banner on the new stadium. Investors plan to donate up to $8 million in revenues to the Livestrong foundation over the next five years.
Laura Ziegler KCUR

Lance Armstrong and members of the Livestrong cancer research foundation are in Kansas City, Kan. this week for the opening of a new soccer stadium that will bear the Livestrong name.

In a bold marketing move, owners of Kansas City's Major League Soccer team gave naming rights to the stadium, and plan to donate millions of dollars to the foundation over the next five years. In return, they hope the popular Livestrong brand will not only attract new fans to soccer, but also help promote a number of related enterprises.

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12:01am

Thu June 9, 2011
Asia

Japanese Told To Beat The Heat With Hawaiian Shirts

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:46 am

"I would wear this if my company let me," says recruitment consultant Tomoyoki Chikawa.
Louisa Lim/NPR

At Japan's Environment Ministry, the atmosphere is almost preppy; it's full of fresh-faced young people in polo shirts, Crocs and even the odd Hawaiian shirt. This is the birthplace of Super Cool Biz, an energy-saving dress code designed to help ease power shortages following Japan's nuclear crisis, which could just lead to a revolution in Japanese office wear.

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12:01am

Thu June 9, 2011
Around the Nation

How Do You Dismantle A Meth Lab?

Originally published on Mon July 4, 2011 10:01 pm

Methamphetamine seizures are on the rise, and a crackdown on the drug during the last decade has led to some dramatic drops in manufacturing across the U.S.

But in some states, the numbers are edging back up to where they were before. Addicts have found easier ways to make the illegal drug, despite stricter laws regulating one of its key ingredients, pseudoephedrine.

Tennessee led the nation with more than 2,000 meth lab busts last year. But new federal cleanup rules and the reluctance of state legislators to pass stiffer anti-meth laws are hampering police.

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12:01am

Thu June 9, 2011
Technology

Divisions Seen In Administration Over Cyberthreats

A long-standing debate within the Obama administration over how to characterize the cyberthreat has complicated the U.S. effort to lay out a government-wide cybersecurity strategy.

At issue is whether the nation faces the prospect of cyberwar and needs to prepare for it. The Pentagon says yes. Howard Schmidt, the White House coordinator for cybersecurity, sees such talk as "hype" and rejects the "cyberwar" term.

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12:01am

Thu June 9, 2011
Middle East

Turkish Border Town Feels Effects Of Syrian Unrest

Mustapha Mutafugulu, who runs a textile factory in Gaziantep, Turkey, says the economic situation in Aleppo, Syria, is difficult.
Deborah Amos NPR

In the open-air restaurants of Gaziantep in southern Turkey, the summer season has begun, but Syrian tourists who flocked here for the past few years are absent. And Turks no longer make the 90-minute drive to Aleppo, Syria's largest northern city for bargain holidays.

At a local trade fair, Syrians came to attract business partners. Ayala Zenio acknowledged Turks are now reluctant to open new deals because of the unrest in Syria, but she insists the coverage in the Western media is wrong.

"It's not so much like the TV show us," she says.

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6:43pm

Wed June 8, 2011
The Two-Way

BP: China Surpasses U.S. As World's Biggest Energy Consumer

A worker walks by at an oil refinery of China's Sinopec, in Wuhan, central China's Hubei province.
STR AFP/Getty Images

According to a review of world energy use conducted by the oil company BP, China has become the world's biggest energy consumer. The Financial Times reports:

The BP publication shows that China accounted for 20.3 per cent of consumption, surpassing the US, with a 19 per cent share of the global total.

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6:42pm

Wed June 8, 2011
The Two-Way

New York Times: Anthony Weiner's Wife Is Pregnant

Citing three unnamed sources, the New York Times is reporting that Huma Abedin, Rep. Anthony Weiner's wife, is expecting the couple's first child:

Ms. Abedin, 35, is in the early stages of pregnancy, according to three people with knowledge of the situation.

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6:22pm

Wed June 8, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Appeals Court Hears 26-State Challenge To Health Law

Atlanta was today's host city for the latest skirmish in the battle over last year's federal health overhaul, as the measure went before a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals.

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5:31pm

Wed June 8, 2011
Latin America

Imported Beavers Gnaw Away At Argentina's Forests

A beaver dam sits on the appropriately named Beaver Creek. Beavers aren't native to the region, but you would never know it — there are dams, beaver lodges and felled trees all over the creek.
Juan Forero NPR

At the frosty southernmost tip of South America, a devastating problem is afoot — and it's a very furry one. A small group of Canadian beavers introduced into the wild in 1946 have multiplied into an army of 200,000 across a remote archipelago.

And those beavers have been busy, chomping and gnawing their way through pristine forests.

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5:18pm

Wed June 8, 2011
Monkey See

Summer Television: A Time Of 'Men,' Werewolves And Aliens

Andre Braugher, LisaGay Hamilton, Ray Romano and Scott Bakula star on TNT's Men Of A Certain Age.
Danny Feld TNT

Feel like you're drowning in a flood of so-called "reality" television, Canadian series imports and new cable shows?

It's not you, it's TV; specifically, the oddball land of summer television.

As the big networks try to avoid looking like they've gone fishin' for summer and cable amps up its schedule, there's a new universe of programming for small screen fans to sort though. And there's a few standout series worth seeing — and avoiding — in the weeks to come.

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