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10:05am

Wed July 9, 2014
Parallels

Gas In Egypt Is 78 Percent More Expensive Now Than Last Week

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 12:51 pm

Egyptians gather at a petrol station in Cairo as the government drastically raised fuel prices to tackle a bloated subsidy system on July 5.
Mahmoud Khaled AFP/Getty Images

It's 2 p.m. on a hot day in Cairo and cars are lined up for blocks at this gas station in the east of the capital. People are waiting to fill their cars with the cheapest gas available — which is 78 percent more expensive than it was last week.

Ali Fayoumi yells from his window.

"I've been waiting for an hour and a half," he fumes. "Even the cheapest gas is too expensive. Everything is expensive, food, drink, everything."

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6:40am

Wed July 9, 2014
The Two-Way

Top Stories: More Israeli Airstrikes; Hamas Fires Rockets

Good morning, here is our early story:

-- Israel Strikes Gaza, As Hamas Rockets Show Increased Range.

And here are more early headlines:

Obama To Visit Texas Today, But Not The Border. (AP)

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6:02am

Wed July 9, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Amazon Makes Direct Offer To Hachette Authors

Paul Sakuma AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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3:06am

Wed July 9, 2014
Law

States Push For Prison Sentence Overhaul; Prosecutors Push Back

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:01 am

The Lafayette Parish Correctional Center in downtown Lafayette, La. By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country, but sentencing reformers have loosened some of the state's mandatory minimum sentences and made parole slightly easier to get.
Denny Culbert for NPR

Some red states like Louisiana and Texas have emerged as leaders in a new movement: to divert offenders from prisons and into drug treatment, work release and other incarceration alternatives.

By most counts, Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the country. In recent years, sentencing reformers in the capital, Baton Rouge, have loosened some mandatory minimum sentences and have made parole slightly easier for offenders to get.

But as reformers in Louisiana push for change, they're also running into stiffening resistance — especially from local prosecutors.

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3:06am

Wed July 9, 2014
Law

Gay Teacher Files Sex Discrimination Claim Against Georgia School

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:40 am

Flint Dollar practices organ at First Presbyterian Church in Milledgeville, Ga. He's working there part time while he pursues a legal complaint against a private Catholic school that declined to renew his position after administrators learned he plans to marry his male partner.
Adam Ragusea Georgia Public Broadcasting

For the past four years, Flint Dollar has been teaching music at Mount de Sales Academy, a Catholic school in Macon, Ga. He is, by all accounts, beloved by his students.

But Dollar won't be leading the band or teaching the chorus in the fall. His contract was not renewed after administrators found out he plans to marry a man.

Under federal anti-discrimination laws, employers are not prohibited from hiring or firing people on the basis of sexual orientation. Dollar is working to change that.

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