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3:16pm

Sat January 28, 2012
Business

Made In The USA: Saving The American Brand

General Motors, headquartered in Detroit, recovered from near disaster after a financial bailout from the federal government.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

A majestic building still dominates the skyline of Rochester, N.Y., the word "Kodak" shining brightly from the top. It's the legacy of George Eastman — the founder of the Eastman Kodak Co. — a company that helped Rochester thrive and gave it the nickname "Kodak Town."

In 1976, Kodak sold 90 percent of the film around the world. The company basically invented digital photography, but it couldn't figure out how to make the transition from film quickly enough to out-compete its Asian rivals. Of the 20 best-selling digital cameras in the U.S., not a single one is from Kodak.

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2:30pm

Sat January 28, 2012
Business

GM CEO: No Apologies For Accepting U.S. Bailout

Just a few years ago, America's auto industry was on the verge of collapse. When President Obama took office, he had to decide whether to bail out General Motors or let it die. He chose to send them a lifeline, to the tune of $50 billion. In this week's State of the Union speech, President Obama said that decision paid off.

"Today, General Motors is back on top as the world's No. 1 automaker," Obama said.

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2:29pm

Sat January 28, 2012
Books

'The Snowy Day': Breaking Color Barriers, Quietly

Originally published on Tue January 31, 2012 8:13 am

With special permission from The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

One morning many years ago, a little boy in Brooklyn named Peter woke up to an amazing sight: fresh snow.

Peter is the hero of the classic children's book by Ezra Jack Keats, The Snowy Day, which turns 50 this year. Peter has a red snowsuit, a stick just right for knocking snow off of trees, and a snowball in his pocket. And, though this is never mentioned in the text, Peter is African-American.

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11:55am

Sat January 28, 2012
Art & Design

At 100, Pollock's Legend Still Splattered On Art World

Influenced by Mexican and Native American art, Pollock popularized action-painting and drip style, as seen in Number 7, 1951.
Pollock-Krasner Foundation, National Gallery of Art/Artists Rights Society

Even a century since his birth, American "splatter artist" Jackson Pollock still provokes heated debate about the very definition of art.

Was a man who placed a canvas on the floor and dripped paint straight from the can actually creating a work of art?

"It's very hard if you try to build the paint up to this extent with this many colors and not achieve mud," says National Gallery of Art curator Harry Cooper.

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10:48am

Sat January 28, 2012
The Record

For Eager Fans, Small Labels Roll Out All-Access Plans

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 5:56 pm

Stones Throw is one of a handful of indie labels to make its new releases available to fans on a subscription basis.
Courtesy of Stones Throw Records

This week, Stones Throw Records — the storied L.A. indie label that has put out under-the-radar hip-hop, funk and soul since 1996 — announced a new, one-stop way for fans to get its music. For a $10 monthly fee, every new album, EP and single the label releases will come straight to your inbox in the form of high-quality, DRM-free MP3s.

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