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3:00am

Sat January 14, 2012
Author Interviews

Is It Time For You To Go On An 'Information Diet'?

"Clicks have consequences" says Clay Johnson, author of The Information Diet.
iStockphoto.com

We're used to thinking of "obesity" in physical terms — unhealthful weight that clogs our arteries and strains our hearts. But there's also an obesity of information that clogs our eyes and our minds and our inboxes: unhealthful information deep-fried in our own preconceptions.

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4:53pm

Fri January 13, 2012
Law

Judicial Vacancies Rising Under Obama, Study Says

President Obama was slow off the mark in his first year, making fewer nomination than his predecessors, according to a Brookings Institution report. But the amount of time needed to win confirmation once nominations have been made has also risen dramatically.
iStockphoto.com

Federal trial court vacancies are going up under President Obama, even as caseloads are rising. A Brookings Institution report released Friday shows that this is the first time in memory that a president three years into his first term has seen judicial vacancies rise.

The report shows that Obama has been slower to nominate trial judges, the Senate slower to confirm them, and at the same time a larger number of judges are retiring.

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4:18pm

Fri January 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Russian Spacecraft Expected To Crash Into Earth This Weekend

Originally published on Sat January 14, 2012 3:33 pm

The Zenit-2SB rocket with Phobos-Grunt (Phobos-Soil) craft blasts off from its launch pad at the Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.
Oleg Urusov AP

There are two stories about space junk today: First, the AP reports that the International Space Station had to fire its engines to move out of the way of some space junk.

"NASA officials said debris from an old U.S. private communication satellite would have come within three miles of the orbiting outpost on Friday had the station not changed its orbit," the AP reports.

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4:07pm

Fri January 13, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama's Most Vocal Black Critics Dial Back Attacks As Election Year Begins

Princeton professor Cornel West (right) and talk show host Tavis Smiley (left) on their 18-city poverty tour on Oct. 9, 2011.
JIM RUYMEN UPI /Landov

The dynamic duo of PBS host Tavis Smiley and professor/activist Cornel West was it again in Washington Thursday evening during a live television broadcast of a program addressing poverty.

The two have made a traveling roadshow out of their roles as the loudest African-American critics of President Obama.

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3:08pm

Fri January 13, 2012
NPR Story

A Look At Romney's Olympic Legacy

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:07 am

At the opening ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Mitt Romney (left) stands with President George W. Bush (center) and International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge (right) in front of the American flag that flew at the World Trade Center before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
George Frey AFP/Getty Images

Ten years after the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics, there's still some debate about Mitt Romney's claim that he helped "save" the games — and about whether he used the Olympics to relaunch a fledgling political career.

In 1999, Romney accepted the job as CEO of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee (SLOC), five years after he failed to oust Sen. Ted Kennedy from his Massachusetts Senate seat.

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