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1:22pm

Mon November 28, 2011
Africa

In Egypt's Vote, Islamists Expect Strong Showing

Sobhi Saleh, right, a senior member of the Muslim Brotherhood and candidate for parliament, speaks to voters at a polling station in Alexandria, Egypt on Monday. The Brotherhood is expected to make a strong showing in the polls.
Tarek Fawzy AP

Dozens of veiled women tried to squeeze past each other Monday and into a polling station in the working-class neighborhood of Raml in the northern Egyptian city of Alexandria.

They were eager to cast ballots for a clean-shaven man in a crisp blue suit and matching tie.

His name is Sobhi Saleh and he heads the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party ticket in three of Alexandria's districts. The party is considered the best organized in Egypt and is expected to do well in the country's first election since President Hosni Mubarak was toppled in February.

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1:16pm

Mon November 28, 2011
All Tech Considered

Warmth In Winter: Smart Windows To Let Heat In

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 4:26 pm

Researchers at the window testing facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are developing nanocrystal technology. When activated by a small electrical current, it would allow light but not heat through.
Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

When you think of high-tech gadgets that make us greener, you might picture solar panels or electric cars; windows may not seem as exciting. But buildings are responsible for 40 percent of the country's energy use, and researchers say they can lower that number by making windows smarter.

As someone who studies windows, Howdy Goudey isn't surprised that most of us find them a little boring.

"It's a pretty pedestrian object," he says. "You know, what's new to do with a window?"

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1:11pm

Mon November 28, 2011
It's All Politics

Barney Frank, Congress' Gay-Rights Pioneer, 'Not Retiring From Advocacy'

Originally published on Tue December 13, 2011 1:58 pm

Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank, amid journalists in Newton, Mass., after announcing Monday he won't seek reelection next year.
Stephan Savoia AP

Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank says he decided not to seek re-election to a 17th term in 2012 because congressional redistricting would have given him a slew of new constituents and a difficult, expensive campaign.

"I think I would have won," Frank, 71, said during a Monday press conference in Massachusetts announcing his retirement. "But it would have been a tough campaign."

Added Frank, who has led financial reform efforts on Capitol Hill: "I don't like raising money."

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1:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
NPR Story

Judge Nixes Citigroup Deal

A federal judge nixed a $285 million settlement agreement between Citigroup and the Securities and Exchange Commission involving a major financial case. U.S. District Court Judge Jed Rakoff said the proposed agreement is "neither far, no reasonable, nor adequate, nor in the public interest." Under the deal, Citi would have settled charges that it misled investors in mortgage debt prior to the collapse of the housing market. Rakoff has been a persistent critic of the SEC's oversight of Wall Street. Guy Raz talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli for more.

1:00pm

Mon November 28, 2011
NPR Story

Millions In Congo Take To The Polls

Millions of voters go to the polls in the Democratic Republic of Congo Monday in only the second election in its history. The mood in the country is tense. The current president Joseph Kabila is deeply unpopular, but many in Congo believe he will go to any lengths to hold onto power. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

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