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4:09am

Sun November 20, 2011
Business

Border-Town Factories Give Manufacturers An Edge

Originally published on Sun November 20, 2011 11:51 am

Employees of TECMA, a cross-border plant or maquiladora, work in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Business leaders say the quick delivery time of goods from Mexico to the U.S. can help revive manufacturing in North America.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Officials in the United States have been wringing their hands lately over how to revitalize domestic manufacturing and keep factories from moving overseas.

But not all of those plants are going across the ocean to China or India or some other low-cost production hub in Asia. Many are relocating just south of the border to Mexico, prompting business leaders to argue that the U.S.-Mexico border region may be the key to rejuvenating manufacturing in North America.

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11:58pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Music Interviews

The Man Behind The Music Of 'Entourage' Sets The Tone

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America. The finale of the second season airs Sunday night on HBO.
Jeff Forney HBO

Scott Vener is the music supervisor for How to Make It in America, which air its season finale Sunday night on HBO.

"I would say primarily a lot of the music I'm finding is sort of like what is bubbling on the Internet," Vener says.

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10:01pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Games & Humor

Where In The Blanks Are The Answers?

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a familiar phrase in the form of "_____ for _____ ." Given the word that follows "for," what's the first word that precedes "for"? For example, if you're given "joy," the answer would be "jump" to complete the phrase "jump for joy."

Last Week's Challenge from listener Henry Hook of Brooklyn, N.Y.: What number comes next in the following series: 2, 4, 6, 9, 11, 15, 20, 40, 51, 55, 60 and 90?

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3:15pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Science

Arson Forensics Sets Old Fire Myths Ablaze

Originally published on Sat November 19, 2011 8:27 pm

A fire burns in a scale model of a living room in the ATF's Fire Research Lab in Beltsville, Maryland. Until the development of the FRL, there were no fire measurement facilities in the U.S., or anywhere, dedicated to the specific needs of the fire investigation community.
Courtesy of the ATF

In 1990, a fire broke out in a house in Jacksonville, Fla., killing two women and four children. The husband of one of the women became the prime suspect, and that's when a fire investigator named John Lentini was called in.

At the time, Lentini says, the initial evidence pointed to a fire that was deliberately set. He calculated that it would have taken about 20 minutes for the house to become engulfed in flames — what's called a flashover — leaving plenty of time for someone to set the fire and get out.

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1:00pm

Sat November 19, 2011
Law

Fighting The Pseudonym Cyberwar

The Department of Justice plans to tighten current laws regarding websites' terms of service conditions. That means if you press that "Agree" button on websites, you better mean it. Some say broadening the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act could even make using a pseudonym on social media outlets a felony. Weekends on All Things Considered guest host host Laura Sullivan talks with Orin Kerr, a professor at George Washington University Law School, about how the government can strengthen the Internet's defenses against cyber warfare while keeping the law reasonable.

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