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2:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Jefferson County, Ala., Files For Bankruptcy

Alabama's most populous county has filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. Jefferson County commissioners voted to declare bankruptcy after years of squabbling with creditors over $4 billion in debt.

2:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Perry Stumbles In Latest GOP Debate

Presidential hopefuls and voters alike sometimes get upset about so-called gotcha questions from reporters that seem designed to embarrass contenders. But Wednesday night's Republican debate outside Detroit demonstrated how some candidates have done a perfectly good job of "getting" themselves.

The debate had some dramatic moments — including one excruciating moment that Texas Gov. Rick Perry would probably like to forget. The comments focused on the economy and jobs, but there were also questions about the sexual harassment allegations against front-runner Herman Cain.

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2:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Steve Inskeep has business news.

2:00am

Thu November 10, 2011
Media

James Murdoch To Testify Again On Hacking Scandal

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 3:38 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's hear now about the latest twist in the scandal at News Corp that erupted earlier this year. News Corp newspapers, controlled by Rupert Murdoch and members of his family, are being investigated over charges of phone hacking and police bribery. This morning in London, top News Corp executive James Murdoch, one of the Rupert Murdoch's sons, went before members of parliament and answered questions about his previous testimony concerning the scandal. NPR's David Folkenflik is in London following the proceedings. Good morning, David.

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10:01pm

Wed November 9, 2011
Science

Credit Controversy: Who Made Key Cosmos Discovery?

American astronomer Edwin Hubble looks through the eyepiece of the 100-inch telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory in Los Angeles, 1937. In 1929, Hubble proposed that the more distant a galaxy is, the faster it appears to be receding from us, a concept that has become known as Hubble's law.
Margaret Bourke-White Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

A controversy erupted earlier this year over who deserved credit for what many say is the most important astronomical discovery of the 20th century: the realization that the universe was expanding.

In 1929, American astronomer Edwin Hubble proposed that the more distant a galaxy is, the faster it appears to be receding from us, a concept that is known as Hubble's law.

Astronomer Mario Livio has worked with the Hubble Space Telescope for more than 20 years. "So clearly, anything Hubble is of interest to me," he says.

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