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1:41pm

Mon November 7, 2011
The Two-Way

Verdict Expected In Trial Of Michael Jackson's Doctor

Dr. Conrad Murray watches the testimony of paramedic Richard Senneff, during Murray's involuntary manslaughter trial at the Los Angeles Superior Court on Sept. 30 in Los Angeles.
Pool Getty Images

Update at 4:16 p.m. ET: A California jury has found Dr. Conrad Murray guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the 2009 death of pop icon Michael Jackson.

As the clerk read the verdict, Murray looked on with a blank stare. When the clerk said guilty, an emotional shriek was heard in the courtroom.

As the judge read the jury more instructions, the Houston cardiologist sat next to his counsel without any visible emotion. Television images showed that Jackson fans outside the court house rejoiced.

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1:23pm

Mon November 7, 2011
Law

Can Passports List 'Jerusalem, Israel' As Birthplace?

The United States Supreme Court heard arguments on Monday in a case that combines the Middle East conflict with the dueling foreign policy roles of Congress and the president. Specifically, the question was whether Congress can force the executive branch to list Israel as the birthplace for United States citizens born in Jerusalem.

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1:18pm

Mon November 7, 2011
The Two-Way

Barnes & Noble Introduces Nook Tablet

The Nook Tablet has a 7-inch color touchscreen and follows the introduction of Amazon.com's $199 Kindle Fire tablet.
barnesandnoble.com

Barnes & Noble announced today that it, too, was entering the tablet market. Its Nook Tablet aims to compete with Amazon's Kindle Fire and Apple's iPad.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

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1:00pm

Mon November 7, 2011
NPR Story

Michael Jackson's Personal Physician Found Guilty

Robert Siegel talks with NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates about Monday's verdict in the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray. Michael Jackson's personal physician was found guilty.

1:00pm

Mon November 7, 2011
NPR Story

Report: Wealth Gap Widens Between Old And Young

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 6:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. We've been hearing a lot lately about the gap between rich and poor in this country. Well, now a new angle on that gap between young and old. Research out today finds that older Americans are significantly better off than seniors a generation ago, but young adults have fallen dramatically behind.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports.

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