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4:49pm

Thu October 13, 2011
The Two-Way

Poll: Support For Death Penalty At 39-Year Low

Gallup

A Gallup poll released today found support for the death penalty in the United States is at a 39-year low. As Gallup reports, "this is the lowest level of support since 1972, the year the Supreme Court voided all existing state death penalty laws in Furman v. Georgia."

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4:20pm

Thu October 13, 2011
Economy

In Spartanburg, S.C., Jobs Are Especially Scarce

Volunteer Dean Ford prepares bags of food to be distributed at the First Baptist Spartanburg's food pantry program.

Melissa Block NPR

The job market is barely treading water. The Labor Department Thursday reported that 404,000 people filed for unemployment benefits last week — pretty much unchanged from the week before. Overall, there are 14 million people looking for work in the U.S.

One of those places where jobs are especially hard to find is Spartanburg, S.C.

On Thursday, the Occupy Wall Street protests spread to the heavily conservative corner of the heavily conservative state. It was a small turnout — about 20 people got some honks of support and some catcalls from people who shouted, "Get a job!"

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4:15pm

Thu October 13, 2011
Media

Tracking The Media's Eye On Occupy Wall Street

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 8:25 pm

Protesters with Occupy Wall Street march along New York's 5th Avenue, where prominent heads of major business and financial institutions live, on Tuesday. The movement has expanded, along with media coverage.

Spencer Platt Getty Images

In recent days, the Occupy Wall Street protests appear to be gathering steam, spreading beyond New York City to other cities across the country. The growing reach of the demonstrations has added to the pressure on journalists to figure out how to cover them.

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4:08pm

Thu October 13, 2011
The Two-Way

Handing Apple A Win, Australia Bans Sale Of Samsung Tablet

A woman holds an Apple iPad (L) next to a Samsung Galaxy Tab during the 50th International consumer electronics fair in Sept. 2010.

Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

An Australian court issued a temporary injunction that bars Samsung from selling its Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet computer in the country. The judgement is a big win for Apple, which has filed lawsuits worldwide alleging that Samsung had copied its iPhone and iPad.

The Australian court ruled Samsung could not sell its device if included certain features such as a touch-screen.

The AP reports:

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3:50pm

Thu October 13, 2011
NPR Ombudsman

Why Do You Call Him Mr. Obama?

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 2:54 pm

Alex Wong/Getty Images

A number of listeners have written in recent weeks complaining that NPR reporters refer to President Obama as "Mr. Obama." Since the mid-1970s it has been NPR's policy to refer to the president as "Mr." instead of "President" on second reference. Below is an explanatory column slightly updated from 2009. We invite you to share your thoughts in the comments section.

Why Do You Call Him Mr. Obama?
Lori Grisham, Assistant to the Ombudsman

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