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1:50pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Music Interviews

Johnny Winter: A Blues Legend's Texas 'Roots'

Johnny Winter's new album is called Roots.
Paul Natkin Getty Images

In the late 1960s, Columbia Records won a bidding war to sign a young blues-rocker. More than 40 years and countless recording sessions later, Johnny Winter is still playing the blues.

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1:30pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Art & Design

Pop Art Master Oldenburg Unveils Another Big Idea

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:22 am

Tom Crane Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

Pop art master Claes Oldenburg will officially unveil his latest sculpture outside the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts on Saturday. Oldenburg is known for taking everyday objects and blowing them up to impossible sizes. At first, his giant clothespins and spoons made him a target for ridicule. But now you can find examples of Oldenburg's work all over the world, from Cologne to Cleveland. And they've been embraced — for the most part.

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1:25pm

Fri September 30, 2011
The Two-Way

Google, Apple Hire High-Profile Lobbyist To Ask Congress For A Tax Holiday

Bloomberg has a story worth reading, today. They report that Google, Apple and Cisco Systems' lobbying for a tax holiday on offshore profits has just received a big gun.

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1:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
NPR Story

Commentator Jo Carson Dies At 64

Michele Norris and Melissa Block remember former All Things Considered commentator Jo Carson who died earlier this month in the place where she was born — John City, Tenn. She was 64. She was a playwright, fiction author, and children's' book author.

1:00pm

Fri September 30, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Libya's Newest Concern: Looming Political Battles

Originally published on Fri September 30, 2011 4:48 pm

Abdel Hakim Belhaj (center left), a prominent militia commander, walks with Transitional National Council Chairman Mustafa Abdel Jalil in Tripoli on Sept. 10. The battle to oust Moammar Gadhafi produced a number of leaders who will have to work together to form a new government.
Francois Mori AP

Libya's victorious militias are still fighting the last forces loyal to ousted strongman Moammar Gadhafi, but as the military endgame draws closer, some are worrying about the political battles that are just beginning.

The question is an old one for revolutionaries: How to go from a military triumph to a civilian government?

In Libya, the problem is magnified because the fighting is still going on and the military consists of various regional militias that don't answer to a single commander.

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