NPR News

Pages

10:01pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Space

Where Falling Satellite Lands Is Anyone's Guess

This artist's conceptual image shows the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, or UARS. After two decades in orbit, the satellite will make an uncontrolled re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere.
NASA

Later this week, a retired NASA satellite the size of a school bus will finally fall back towards Earth after orbiting the planet for two decades. Most of it will burn up in the atmosphere. But about two dozen pieces are expected to hit the ground — somewhere.

And the biggest piece will weigh about 300 pounds.

If that's got you worried, NASA emphasizes that in the history of the space age, there have been no confirmed reports of falling space junk hurting anyone. But that doesn't mean no one has ever been hit.

Read more

10:01pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Planet Money

'Operation Twist,' Explained In 4 Easy Steps

Note: Robert Smith has an Operation Twist explainer on Wednesday's Morning Edition. That story is attached above.

The interest rate on 10-year Treasury bonds is 1.95 percent. This is crazy low. It's lower than inflation. But the Federal Reserve may be about to push the rate even lower.

Read more

10:01pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Politics

As The 'Un-Candidate,' Palin Tests GOP Patience

Author Joe McGinniss has been out this week promoting his new book about Sarah Palin — a book widely condemned for gossipy allegations by anonymous sources. The book is getting attention in part because Palin might be running for president.

This summer, Palin certainly looked like a presidential candidate as she rode through Iowa and New Hampshire in a red-white-and-blue bus, but as time ticks away the pressure is building on Palin to make her candidacy official.

Read more

10:01pm

Tue September 20, 2011
World

At U.N., Obama Faces Palestinian Challenge

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 11:41 am

President Obama meets with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday in New York City. The two men discussed the Palestinian issue only after reporters had left the room.
Pool Getty Images

Palestinians say they still plan to seek recognition of their statehood from the U.N. Security Council this week, throwing more than a wrench into the diplomatic works for the Obama administration.

President Obama has promised to veto the move in the Security Council. That puts the U.S. on sound footing with Israel, but on a collision course with European and Middle Eastern allies who support the Palestinians' bid.

Read more

10:00pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Movie Interviews

Syd Mead, Still Designing The Future After 50 Years

The classic future: Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, released in 1982, envisioned a cityscape with buildings wrapped in video displays — well before New York's Times Square went digital.
Warner Bros. Pictures

Look around. There's a good chance you'll spot a tablet computer, if you don't have one yourself. Touch-screen phones are even more common. Biometric scanners scan your fingerprints at your bank, or your irises at the airport. They're devices that used to be the stuff of science fiction — the sort of thing you'd see in Star Trek or Blade Runner or Minority Report. Now they're here in the real world. And they're everywhere.

How did so many films and TV shows get so much right about what was coming down the technological pipeline?

Read more
Tags: 

Pages