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7:03pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Research News

Why The Trip Home Seems To Go By Faster

Does getting home from your vacation spot always seem to take less time than getting there? A new scientific study provides an explanation for why.
Harold M. Lambert Lambert/Getty Images

In 1969, astronaut Alan Bean went to the moon as the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12. Although the trip going to the moon covered the same distance as the trip back, "returning from the moon seemed much shorter," Bean says.

People will often feel a return trip took less time than the same outbound journey, even though it didn't. In the case of Apollo 12, the trip back from the moon really did take somewhat less time. But the point remains that this so-called "return trip effect" is a very real psychological phenomenon, and now a new scientific study provides an explanation.

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4:26pm

Fri September 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Federal Government Sues Big Banks Over Risky Mortgage Securities

The Federal Government filed suit against more than a dozen big banks over mortgage backed securities the banks sold during the housing boom. Essentially the government claims the banks were selling securities that were riskier than advertised.

As we reported earlier, The New York Times reported this news, last night. But, now, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which was appointed to oversee mortgage buyers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, filed the lawsuits today.

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4:06pm

Fri September 2, 2011
Economy

Federal Agency Sues Banks Over Mortgage Securities

The Federal Housing Finance Agency sued several major banks over risky mortgage securities they sold. Melissa Block talks to NPR's Jim Zarroli for more.

3:40pm

Fri September 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Federal Judge Rules Roger Clemens Will Face New Trial

Originally published on Fri September 2, 2011 3:54 pm

One-time baseball pitching star Roger Clemens is not off the hook.

A federal judge ruled Friday that Clemens must stand trial a second time for allegedly lying to a Congressional committee about steroid use. In July, Judge Reggie Walton declared a mistrial due to prosecutorial misconduct.

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3:13pm

Fri September 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Rupert Murdoch Receives $12.5M Bonus; Son James Declines $6M Bonus

News Corp. Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch (right), testifying alongside his son James, said his appearance before a British parliamentary inquiry in London was "the most humble day of my life."
Parbul AFP/Getty Images

Rupert Murdoch, the chairman and chief executive of the embattled News Corporation, received a $12.5 million cash bonus for the fiscal year that ended in June.

That may come as a surprise, considering that Murdoch has been at the helm of News Corp. as it tries to weather a phone hacking scandal that has led to the arrest of 13 people and the resignation of two of Murdoch's top executives.

Murdoch's son, James, who is his deputy, turned down a $6 million bonus, which would have been a 74 percent increase from his 2010 take-home pay.

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