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10:01pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Economy

In Jobless Data, Devil May Be In Details

The Labor Department releases its reports on August unemployment on Friday. What economists are expecting is by now a familiar story: That August did not generate enough job growth to move the needle on the jobless rate. But the most intractable part of the jobless problem might be the one that doesn't show up in the numbers.

The unemployment rate is expected to tick up slightly to 9.2 percent. Two years ago, the unemployment rate was 9.5 percent.

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10:01pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Business

Surprising Areas See Growth In Green Jobs

When you think about Green Energy and its jobs, Albany, N.Y., probably wouldn't be the first city that pops into your head. But according to a report, the upstate New York region has the highest concentration of green jobs in the country. Another surprising area in the top 10: Cleveland and northeast Ohio.

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10:01pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Economy

Democrats Urge Obama To 'Go Big' With Jobs Package

When a president asks for a prime-time slot to address a joint session of Congress, he is signaling to the country that he has something very important to say. Next Thursday President Obama will once again try to make a hard political pivot to the issue of jobs.

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10:01pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Latin America

In Cuba, Women Often Prefer Thumbing A Ride

Cuba's capital, Havana, has good public safety and terrible public transportation. That has led to a curious form of travel, especially for young women in the city: urban hitchhiking.

At major intersections, women climb in and out of strangers' cars, commuting to work or running errands in a way that would be almost unthinkable in any other Latin American capital.

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10:01pm

Thu September 1, 2011
StoryCorps

A Father Reflects On Strength And Meeting His Match

Robert Stover, 83, with his daughter, Valerie Anderson, 56, in Howard, Pa.
StoryCorps

Robert Stover grew up in the late 1930s, and as he remembers, he never really had a hometown.

"My father was a salesman with the Hoover Vacuum Cleaner Company. He could move into a city and sell out its potential fairly rapidly. So I lived all over," Stover tells his daughter, Valerie Anderson.

Making friends wasn't easy.

"When I would get to a new town, everybody had to see who could whip the new boy," Robert says. "I was willing to stipulate that they all could — including the females. But it had to be proven."

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