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2:58pm

Thu August 11, 2011
'Radio Diaries'

The Last Man On The Mountain

Jimmy Weekley, 71, shown here with a friend, says that when he was a kid, there were more than two dozen homes in Pigeonroost Hollow, W.Va. "But right now no one else lives in this hollow except me, James Weekley, and the coal company."
Andrew Lichtenstein

James "Jimmy" Weekley has lived in Pigeonroost Hollow in West Virginia for 70 years. He grew up surrounded by family and friends, part of a tight-knit community in the state's southern mountain valley. Like his grandfather, father, uncles and sons, Weekley worked as a coal miner. And like most West Virginians, Weekley saw coal as the economic lifeblood of his community.

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2:42pm

Thu August 11, 2011
Conflict In Libya

In Libya, A Father And Son's Brief War

Mabruk Eshnuk (left) and his son Malik left their home in Pittsburgh to volunteer and fight with rebels in western Libya's Nafusa Mountains.
Ayman Oghanna for NPR

About a month ago, I met Mabruk and Malik Eshnuk, a father and son who had traveled from Pittsburgh to western Libya to help rebels battling forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

The family originally hails from the Libyan coastal city of Zawiya, but left years ago.

Mabruk and Malik were filled with optimism when I spoke to them. Mabruk, the father, had a ready smile and a voluble manner — he spoke so quickly it was often hard to follow him.

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2:32pm

Thu August 11, 2011
Business

Volatile Markets Could Dry Up Funds For Start-Ups

The turmoil in the stock market could curb the spending spree that's been underway in the tech industry, making it for start-ups to raise capital.

Money was on the mind of a group of about two dozen, carefully selected entrepreneurs gathered in Seattle this week.

They're all participants in TechStars, a boot camp and incubator for start-ups. By the end of the three-month program, most of them will be looking for funding from angel investors or venture capitalists.

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2:31pm

Thu August 11, 2011
Economy

In Current Crisis, It's Not Just The Economy

Three years ago, the global economy was brought to the brink by a near meltdown of the international banking system. Now we're in trouble again, but this time our economic woes stem largely from the actions of governments. Escaping from this crisis is more of a political challenge than a financial one.

That doesn't necessarily mean it will be any easier.

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2:20pm

Thu August 11, 2011
Culture And Traditions

In Senegal, The Grandmas Are In Charge

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:33 am

Lightening the mood, the otherwise serious health care proceedings are punctuated by song and dance.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

Long before you reach the circle of women, you hear them and feel their exuberance and warmth. These are the "grandmothers," fondly called les grandes-meres and dressed in brightly colored boubous — the voluminous traditional gowns with dramatic matching head wraps worn by the women of Senegal.

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