NPR News

Pages

1:35pm

Tue August 2, 2011
Asia

China's Supercomputing Goal: From 'Zero To Hero'

The $60 million Tianhe-1A supercomputer in Tianjin, China.
Louisa Lim NPR

Second in a three-part series

China basked in a moment of technological glory last November when it nudged out the U.S. as home of the world's fastest supercomputer.

The achievement was short-lived — after just six months, a Japanese supercomputer three times as fast supplanted the Chinese machine — but it generated intense national pride.

But questions remain as to whether China's much-vaunted supercomputing program will be able to live up to Beijing's high expectations.

Read more

1:28pm

Tue August 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Missouri Outlaws Student-Teacher Facebook Friendship

Originally published on Wed August 3, 2011 4:12 pm

Facebook.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

A law signed into law last month in Missouri is making waves nationally, this week. A small part of the wide-ranging SB54, makes it illegal for teachers to be "friends" with students on any social networking site that allows private communication.

That means teachers and students can't be friends on Facebook or can't follow each other on Twitter for example.

Read more

1:00pm

Tue August 2, 2011
Law

Justice Department Sues Alabama Over Immigration Law

In this June 25, 2011 file photo, participants bow their heads in prayer during a demonstration to protest Alabama's new law against illegal immigration, in Birmingham, Ala.
Jay Reeves AP

Reaction was swift in Alabama on Tuesday after the Justice Department filed a lawsuit to block a new immigration law set to take effect next month.

Alabama's new law — considered the toughest in the country — requires authorities to confirm the status of anyone they stop if there's reasonable doubt that person could be in the U.S. illegally. The law makes it a crime for undocumented immigrants to work, rent an apartment or get a driver's license.

Read more

12:28pm

Tue August 2, 2011
The Two-Way

Norwegian Killer Breivik Quotes Writer; Writer Responds

Anders Behring Breivik, left, leaves an Oslo courthouse in a police car after a hearing. Since then, Breivik has been held in solitary confinement.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Confessed Norwegian mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik's "manifesto" references many statistics and papers dealing with both science and global population. But what if you were a writer — and you learned that the man who killed 77 people had quoted some of your work?

Read more

12:16pm

Tue August 2, 2011
It's All Politics

Now History, Debt-Ceiling Fight Left Much Wreckage In Its Wake

Originally published on Tue August 2, 2011 2:13 pm

President Obama walks back to the Oval Office after speaking about the Senate's passage of debt-ceiling legislation, at the White House on Tuesday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

With the Senate's passage of the debt-ceiling legislation and President Obama having signed it Tuesday afternoon, the nation no longer needs to worry about defaultmageddon, at least not until early 2013 when the U.S. Treasury once again runs out of the room to borrow again.

But even though there wasn't a default, the fight left plenty of wreckage laying about.

Among the casualties was Obama. Yes, he seemed to have narrowly averted becoming the first president to have the nation default during his term.

Read more

Pages