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8:10am

Wed July 20, 2011
The Two-Way

Sales Of Existing Homes Fell 0.8 Percent In June

There was a 0.8 percent drop in sales of existing homes in June from May, the National Association of Realtors just reported. They dipped to an annual rate of 4.77 million.

According to NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun, there was "an unusual spike in contract cancellations in the past month."

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7:58am

Wed July 20, 2011
Opinion

Foreign Polcy: The Price Is Right

A woman is seen begging for food in Polonnaruwa, Ceylon, date unknown.
AP

Charles Kenny is a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development and a Schwartz fellow at the New America Foundation.

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7:55am

Wed July 20, 2011
Opinion

New Republic: 'Cut, Cap And Balance' Is Sabatoge

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), the Republican Study Committee chairman, center, is surrounded by fellow House GOP members after passage of the conservative deficit reduction plan known as "Cut, Cap and Balance" in the GOP-controlled House, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 19, 2011.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Ed Kilgore is a special correspondent for The New Republic.

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7:51am

Wed July 20, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: That's A Lot Of Zeros

President Barack Obama discusses the continuing budget talks, Tuesday, July 19, 2011, in the the briefing room of the White House in Washington.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Jeffrey H. Anderson was the senior speechwriter for Secretary Mike Leavitt at the Department of Health and Human Services.

President Obama repeatedly insists that the debt ceiling must be raised by at least $2.4 trillion. Why this particular amount, rather than, say, an even $1 trillion or $2 trillion? Because $2.4 trillion is Obama's estimate for what it would take to get him through the next election without needing to deal with another debt ceiling battle. In other words, $2.4 trillion is a politically generated figure.

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7:24am

Wed July 20, 2011
The Two-Way

'Triangle Of Death' In Horn Of Africa; Famine Grips Southern Somalia

Monday (July 18, 2011): At a refugee camp near Mogadishu, a Somali woman cries after the death of one of her children.
Mustafa Abdi AFP/Getty Images

As the United Nations escalates its dire warnings about what's happening in the Horn of Africa, declaring today that drought and famine in southern Somalia threaten millions of people, NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports from a refugee camp in Kenya that an area straddling Somalia, Ethiopia and northern Kenya has been dubbed "the triangle of death."

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