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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
National Security

Terrorism Training Casts Pall Over Muslim Employee

In the first of two stories on counterterrorism training, NPR reports on one training session that turned a state employee into a suspect.

The man at the center of this story is a 59-year-old Jordanian-American named Omar al-Omari. He looks very much like the college professor that he is — all tweed jacket, button-down shirt, thick round glasses, drinking coffee. We met at a coffee shop near downtown Columbus, Ohio, where he laid out a series of events that ended with him being accused of having links to terrorism.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

Crafting Shuttles: Labor Of Love, Vanishing Art

A worker tests components on a model of the space shuttle before wind tunnel testing.
NASA

As space shuttle Atlantis orbits the Earth on NASA's last shuttle mission, it's worth remembering that key parts of this high-tech spaceship were handmade by people back here on Earth.

Five years ago, NPR profiled a few of the workers who make pieces of NASA's shuttles, using everyday tools like sewing needles and X-ACTO knives. With the shuttle program ending, NPR revisited those people to see how their lives are changing now that the shuttles will no longer need them.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Author Interviews

Education Of An Interrogator: Questioning The CIA

Glenn Carle served for 23 years in the Clandestine Services of the Central Intelligence Agency.
Sally J. Carle

Glenn Carle's bosses asked him if he could go on a trip — one that would last somewhere between 30 and 60 days. His job? To interrogate a man suspected of being a top member of al-Qaida.

It was 2002 and, in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 tragedy, the U.S. was heavily engaged in its "War on Terror." Carle, a former CIA intelligence officer, was "surged" to become an interrogator and sent to one of the Agency's secret overseas facilities. He writes about his experience in his new book, The Interrogator: An Education.

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6:59pm

Sun July 17, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Women Lose To Japan, In A Title Game Of Many Chances

Originally published on Sun July 17, 2011 4:59 pm

Members of the U.S. women's national team look on after losing the FIFA Women's World Cup Final against Japan. The Americans lost on penalty kicks after overtime expired with the teams tied, 2-2.
Joern Pollex Getty Images

The FIFA Women's World Cup final between the U.S. and Japan had a familiar feel to it, as the American squad once again found themselves being pushed to the brink. But the confidence, skill and resourcefulness that propelled them past Brazil and France weren't quite enough Sunday, and the U.S. women lost despite never trailing Japan in 120 minutes of play on the field.

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4:59pm

Sun July 17, 2011
Religion

How Bible Stories Evolved Over The Centuries

A scholar at the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary examines early Greek manuscripts of the New Testament.
Bill Warren Center for New Testament Textual Studies

Many Christians believe that the words of the New Testament are set in stone. But scholars at the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary are chronicling just how much those words have evolved over time.

For 11 years, they've combed through the earliest Greek manuscripts of each book in the New Testament and found more than 17,000 pages of variations. Their ultimate goal: the world's first comprehensive, searchable online database showing how the New Testament has changed.

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