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12:01am

Mon July 11, 2011
News

Bipartisan Debt Talks To Resume Monday

President Barack Obama meets with bipartisan congressional leaders on the debt.
Carolyn Kaster ASSOCIATED PRESS

As the deadline for Congress to raise the debt ceiling creeps steadily closer, a deal to cut the size of government in exchange for raising that debt limit seems as far away as ever. If a White House meeting Sunday night resulted in progress, neither side said so publicly.

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12:01am

Mon July 11, 2011
Around the Nation

Shuttle Program's Next Trip: To The Museum

Artifacts from the space shuttle program, and the final mission by Atlantis, are destined for the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. Here, Atlantis blasts off from Kennedy Space Center for its last mission.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

With the space shuttle down to its final mission, items from the NASA program are destined to become exhibits in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. The person curating those artifacts will be Valerie Neal, who first worked with NASA in 1980.

Neal tells NPR's Mary Louise Kelly that the exhibit has a lot to say about how the shuttles were used. Walking through the museum, she stops in its large hall, near a full-scale test version of the Hubble space telescope.

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12:01am

Mon July 11, 2011
Your Health

An Affliction Of The Cornea Gets A Closer Look

Keratoconus is an eye condition in which the normally round cornea thins, causing a cone-like bulge to develop.
Courtesy of JirehDesign.com

Kaley Jones didn't know what hit her. She was just 17, sitting in her history class, when she realized she suddenly couldn't read what was written on the white board. Nor could she make out the faces of her classmates.

"It was really scary," she says, "It was kind of like looking through plastic wrap. I could see color, but no real detail." Jones later learned she had suffered a rupture of the inner layer of her cornea, a complication of an eye disorder known as keratoconus.

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12:01am

Mon July 11, 2011
National Security

Popularity Of Drones Takes Off For Many Countries

A model of a surveillance drone by the French Dassault Aviation and the British BAE Systems is on display at the International Paris Air Show in June.
Pierre Verdy AFP/Getty Images

As the U.S. begins withdrawing ground troops from Afghanistan and Iraq, it is increasingly depending on unmanned aerial vehicles to track and kill suspected terrorists and other enemies. That has pushed production of the weaponized drones to new levels.

But remotely controlled aircraft, especially the type used for surveillance, are becoming ubiquitous throughout the world, says Peter Singer, author of Wired for War.

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12:01am

Mon July 11, 2011
Your Health

Silicone Breast Implants: Safe, With Caveats

Silicone breast implants were pulled off the market in 1992 amid concerns that leaks from the implants could lead to cancer or autoimmune disease.

Five years ago, revamped products returned to the market. But now the Food and Drug Administration has evaluated the safety of the second generation of silicone implants and the results are mixed.

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