NPR News

Pages

7:34am

Sun May 1, 2011
Latin America

War Turning Mexican Kids Into Targets — Or Killers

Originally published on Sun May 1, 2011 5:34 am

In Mexico's drug war, children are getting increasingly sucked into the violent narcotics trade. Middle-school-age kids are working for the cartels as couriers, lookouts and even assassins. Others are being killed, injured or orphaned in the crossfire.

In the past, drug violence was usually contained between gangs and security forces, but that's changed. Recently, even toddlers have been targeted in attacks involving military-style assault weapons.

Read more

7:34am

Sun May 1, 2011
The Spark

Jon Huntsman: A Political Path, Paved With Detours

There are at least a dozen Republicans considering a run for the White House in 2012. As part of a series, NPR is profiling some of them to find out what first sparked their interest in politics.

In 1971, Jon Huntsman Jr. visited the White House. He was 11 years old, and his father was a businessman and adviser to Richard Nixon. The young Huntsman, the story goes, met Henry Kissinger that day and helped carry his luggage to the car.

Read more

6:17pm

Sat April 30, 2011
Music Interviews

The Cars: The Good Times Are Back

For the early MTV generation, there are few artists more iconic than Ric Ocasek, the frontman of The Cars. Pencil thin, shock of black hair, dark sunglasses, cigarette dangling from his lip — Ric Ocasek was new wave rock and roll. And if the good times stopped rolling for you around the time The Cars split up in the late 1980s, there's good news: Those times are back.

Read more

6:11pm

Sat April 30, 2011
Sunday Puzzle

Where It's At

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase with AT in the middle. The letter A ends the first word of the phrase, and the letter T begins the second word. For the clue, "trying out of something while changes are still being made," the answer would be "beta test."

Read more

4:57pm

Sat April 30, 2011
Around the Nation

Ham Radio Volunteers Worry About Spectrum Plan

Across Alabama, emergency communications systems fell silent this week when tornadoes knocked down antennas and cell phone towers. Amateur radio operators are helping to restore emergency communication in some of the areas hardest hit by the storms. But those volunteers say their ability to provide that help is threatened by a new bill in Congress.

When Hurricane Katrina came ashore in 2005, it destroyed cell phone towers and electrical infrastructure. That left law enforcement and relief agencies without a viable way to communicate — until amateur radio operators stepped in.

Read more

Pages