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1:40pm

Tue April 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Has The Last Typewriter Factory Closed? Not Really

Way back when we first got into the reporting business, an editor (or perhaps several), said that you'd better be absolutely, positively sure if you ever use phrases like "best ever" or "last ever" or "only one in the world."

You're almost surely going to be proved wrong, the crusty old newshounds would say.

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1:31pm

Tue April 26, 2011
World Cafe

Richard Thompson And Loudon Wainwright III On World Cafe

Richard Thompson and Loudon Wainwright III have each assembled remarkable careers, full of top-notch albums and influential music that spans at least 40 years. In the five decades that Thompson has been making music, he's earned some of the highest possible praise for his work as a live performer, guitarist, singer and songwriter.

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12:50pm

Tue April 26, 2011
The Two-Way

More Misery In Missouri: Levee Breached In Poplar Bluff; Region Drenched

The soaking continues from Arkansas northeast through Missouri and on to the Ohio River Valley.

In Poplar Bluff, Mo., "a levee keeping a swollen river from inundating a southeast Missouri town cracked in at least one place Tuesday," The Associated Press reports.

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12:48pm

Tue April 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Mexican Teen Who Dreamed Of Royal Wedding Rebuffed By British Immigration

In a last ditch attempt to bear witness to the Royal Wedding, Estibalis Chavez, 19, staged a 16-day hunger strike in front of the British Embassy. As we reported last week, the stunt didn't land her an official invitation but a good samaritan ponied up enough money to get her on a plane and head to London.

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12:30pm

Tue April 26, 2011
The Record

Phoebe Snow, 'Poetry Man' Singer, Has Died

Phoebe Snow had one of the most distinctive voices in pop music. It went silent Tuesday morning, more than a year after Snow suffered a brain hemorrhage. She was 58.

Snow was 22 when "Poetry Man" reached the Top 10 in 1975. The song sounded like nothing else on the radio. It was refreshing and unusual to see someone embraced on the strength of her voice and songwriting alone — and not her looks. She was not the prefab concoction we've come to know as a pop princess, yet Snow soon graced the cover of Rolling Stone.

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