NPR News

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1:29pm

Sat April 23, 2011
News

Gas Prices: Lessons From The Carter Years

Oil and gas prices are a perennial bane for American presidents. The cycle is familiar by now — they go up, the American people get angry, and they blame the man at the top.

"It's so visible in our lives," political consultant Tad Devine tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer. "Now, through pervasive television coverage, through the Internet and everything else, people are so aware of how much it costs and how quickly it's rising."

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9:05am

Sat April 23, 2011
Music Interviews

Long-Lost Love Songs From A Cajun Music Pioneer

This coming week, New Orleans will welcome thousands of music fans to its banks with the annual Jazz & Cultural Heritage Festival. The city's signature sound started taking shape decades before the recorded era, but one of the first musicians to immortalize zydeco on wax was singer and accordionist Amede Ardoin.

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8:05am

Sat April 23, 2011
Simon Says

Photographers' Focus Was On Other Side Of Lens

I think people in war zones sometimes speak more freely to photographers than they do to reporters. Microphones and notepads can make people conscious of what they're saying. But photographers can talk to them as people, not names in their stories. Photographers ask things like, "Do you have children? Do you like Katy Perry?" instead of, "What political faction do you belong to?"

A couple of great photographers died in a rocket attack of government forces on Misrata, Libya, this week.

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8:00am

Sat April 23, 2011
Middle East

Funerals Begin For Syrian Protesters

Mass funerals are expected in several Syrian cities Saturday for those killed by government security forces during protests on Friday. Human rights groups say at least 100 people were killed; the biggest single-day death toll in Syria's six-week-old uprising. Host Scott Simon talks with Deb Amos.

8:00am

Sat April 23, 2011
Middle East

Battle For Misrata Grows Deadlier

Moammar Gadhafi's forces continued attacks on the besieged Libyan city of Misrata Saturday. The city is one of the last holdouts for rebels in the western part of the country. Hundreds of people have been killed in the battle, and this week, two photojournalists died in a rocket attack while covering the fighting. Host Scott Simon speaks with Wall Street Journal reporter Charles Levinson about the ongoing siege of Misrata and NATO's evolving role in Libya.

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