NPR News

Pages

12:01am

Fri March 25, 2011
Planet Money

Why Japan Will Bounce Back

It's not that there aren't economic disruptions from the earthquake in Japan.

Two of Japan's major industries — electronics and auto manufacturing — both had some factories in the region where the earthquake hit.

Shinichi Sato works for Hino Motors, which makes trucks and buses in Japan. Hino also puts together axles for some Toyota vehicles. Their operations were shut down all last week, and the beginning of this week.

"This is not only Hino," Sato says. "All the automobile companies" are in the same situation.

Read more

12:01am

Fri March 25, 2011
Humans

Texas Find Turns Back Clock On Settlers In America

Originally published on Fri March 25, 2011 11:55 am

Stone artifacts dating back 15,500 years suggest humans may have arrived 2,000 years earlier than previously thought.
Courtesy of Michael R. Waters

A newly excavated site in central Texas contains evidence that the first human settlers in the Lone Star state arrived more than 15,000 years ago. That's more than 2,000 years earlier than scientists originally thought.

The discovery should help end a controversy about whether a culture known as Clovis was the first to settle in the Americas. The site is on Buttermilk Creek, north of Austin, and there are plenty of good reasons why our ancient ancestors would have camped here.

Read more

12:01am

Fri March 25, 2011
Japan In Crisis

Built For Bombs, Sensors Now Track Japan Radiation

As radioactive contamination from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant spreads, a global network of sensors is tracking it across oceans and continents. The network was originally set up to detect nuclear weapons testing, but scientists now hope it can tell them more about the accident.

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization began setting up its monitoring stations about a decade ago, with the eventual goal of enforcing a worldwide ban on nuclear weapons tests.

Read more

12:01am

Fri March 25, 2011
Youths And Gun Violence: Chicago's Challenge

Chicago Youth Program Aims To Decrease Violence

Youth violence rates around the country have been decreasing in recent years, but violent crimes are still most concentrated in poorer, urban neighborhoods. Experts say kids who grow up in dangerous areas are more likely to become targets.

In Chicago, a program called CeaseFire is working to curb violence by helping at-risk youth find employment and patrolling the streets to stop crimes before they happen.

Shooting And Getting Shot At

Read more

12:01am

Fri March 25, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Financial Sanctions Part Of Arsenal Against Gadhafi

The military objective of the Libya campaign is to protect civilians, but the U.S. and other governments have a larger goal: They want Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi out of power. And if airstrikes and 1,000 or so rebel fighters cannot bring down the regime, the anti-Gadhafi effort will depend on financial sanctions.

Read more

Pages