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10:00am

Mon February 7, 2011
The Two-Way

Reports: Google's Wael Ghonim To Be Released By Egyptian Authorities

Update at 12:10 p.m. ET: While (as we said earlier) The Wall Street Journal is quoting, by name, a State Department spokesman as saying that Google executive Wael Thonim has been released from custody in Egypt, The New York Times' Jennifer Preston is tweeting that "I talked to State Dept. It is not confirmed that @ghonim has been released. Too many conflicting reports. Let's get it right."

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9:40am

Mon February 7, 2011
The Two-Way

Groupon's 'Tibet' Super Bowl Ad: Harmless Fun Or Offensive?

It didn't come even close to the top of USA TODAY's annual "Super Bowl Ad Meter," but Groupon's Save the Money - Tibet commercial appears to have won the distinction of being this year's most controversial Super Bowl spot.

Comments — and most are not kind — are flowing into Twitter quickly. A sampling:

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8:50am

Mon February 7, 2011
The Two-Way

Cambodian And Thai Troops Clash; Assange Is Back In Court

Good morning

The crisis in Egypt, as we reported earlier, enters its third week with protesters still camped out in Cairo's Tahrir Square and still demanding that President Hosni Mubarak leave office now — while the Mubarak government continues to say that he'll stay until after elections in September, even as it opens negotiations with opposition groups.

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8:43am

Mon February 7, 2011
Opinion

The New Republic: The Real Costs Of Health Reform

Jonathan Cohn is a senior editor at The New Republic.

Two weeks ago, before a lower federal judge in Florida declared the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, another relatively obscure government figure generated news about health care reform. It was Richard Foster, the chief actuary at the federal agency that runs Medicare and Medicaid.

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8:39am

Mon February 7, 2011
Africa

Sudan's Leader: We Will Respect Southern Secession

The final tally is in, and Southern Sudanese have voted for independence by a staggering margin. The nearly Texas-sized territory is now slated to become the world's newest nation in July.

Nearly 99 percent of Southern Sudanese voted to split Africa's largest country, according to final results released in Khartoum.

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