Amy Held

Amy Held is an editor on the newscast unit. She regularly reports breaking news on air and online.

More than 2,500 tons of raw beef are being added to a recall in connection with a salmonella outbreak that federal officials say has sickened hundreds of people across 25 states.

Dog owners are advised to check labels and remain alert to symptoms of vitamin D toxicity, after the FDA issued a warning that it found excessive — and possibly toxic — levels of the nutrient in certain dry dog foods and some pets have exhibited signs of the poisoning.

The dog foods all come from a single as-yet-unnamed manufacturer and are marketed under at least eight brand names including Abound, Orlando and Natural Life, sold at Kroger, Lidl and other retailers, the FDA said.

Disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein appeared in a New York City courtroom Tuesday and pleaded not guilty to two counts of rape and one count of a criminal sex act, less than a week after a grand jury indicted him.

Weinstein, 66, had been expected to plead not guilty and remains free on bail.

Dozens of women have come forward to accuse Weinstein of persistent sexual misconduct.

Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

Kate Spade, the designer who built a billion-dollar brand of luxury handbags and accessories, was found dead in her Park Avenue apartment in Manhattan on Tuesday. She was 55.

New York Police Department officials said that police received a call around 10:30 a.m. and that officers found Spade unconscious and unresponsive in the bedroom of her Park Avenue apartment. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

"It was a suicide," NYPD spokeswoman Arlene Muniz told NPR, without providing further details.

Seven weeks after a gunman opened fire on Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., wounding 17 people and killing 17 others, the last survivor has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home.

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET

Personal information of up to 87 million people — mostly in the United States — may have been "improperly shared" with Cambridge Analytica, a data analytics firm used by the Trump campaign that has recently come under fire.

A fire broke out early Friday morning at a Michigan kennel, and is believed to have killed all 30 dogs inside, many of which were placed at the facility while their families went away on spring vacation.

Janet Rehfus, of Storm's Ahead Kennels in Nunica, tells NPR that the 30 dogs inside were boarder dogs alongside her own personal dogs, and she is devastated by the loss.

"The heartbreak we feel for the families is immeasurable," she wrote in an email. "We treasure each dog that stays with us."

Rehfus said she has spent the day contacting families individually.

Updated at 7:00 p.m. ET

Days after President Trump ordered the expulsion of 60 Russian officials from the United States and the closure of the Russian Consulate in Seattle because of the poisoning of a Russian ex-spy and his daughter in the U.K., Russia has responded in kind.

Not even a week has passed since it was announced that Fox News firebrand Joseph diGenova was joining President Trump's special counsel legal team to help address the FBI probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Fast forward five days and diGenova and his lawyer wife, Victoria Toensing, are out before they even got in.

Facebook has suspended the data analytics firm that the Trump campaign relied on during the 2016 election, saying the firm improperly received user data and then may have failed to get rid of it.

On Friday, the social media giant announced that Cambridge Analytica; parent company Strategic Communication Laboratories; Christopher Wylie, who helped found Cambridge Analytica; and U.K.-based professor Aleksandr Kogan were all barred from Facebook pending an investigation.

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