Ari Shapiro

Ari Shapiro reports on the White House for NPR with a focus on national security and legal affairs. His stories appear on all of NPR's newsmagazines, including All Things Considered and Morning Edition, where he is also a frequent guest host. Shapiro began covering the White House in 2010 after five years as NPR's Justice Correspondent, during which time his coverage of Justice Department policies and controversies chronicled one of the most tumultuous periods in the department's history.

The first NPR reporter to be promoted to correspondent before age 30, Shapiro has been recognized with several journalism prizes, including The American Bar Association's Silver Gavel for his coverage of prisoners lost in Louisiana's detention system after Hurricane Katrina; The Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize for his investigation of methamphetamine use and HIV transmission; the Columbia Journalism Review's "laurel" recognition of his investigation into disability benefits for injured veterans; and the American Judges' Association's American Gavel for a body of work reporting on courts and the justice system. He has appeared as a guest analyst on television news programs including The NewsHourThe Rachel Maddow Show and CNN Newsroom.

Shapiro is based in Washington, D.C., where, as NPR's Justice Correspondent, he covered some of the most significant court cases in recent history, including Supreme Court rulings on Guantanamo detainees, the perjury trial of top White House official Lewis "Scooter" Libby and the fraud trial of Alaska Senator Ted Stevens. He has also broken stories about the government's evolving approach to counterterrorism, detention and interrogation policies. He investigated abuses of Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib prison and covered the legal proceedings against American soldiers accused of those abuses.

Before covering the Justice Department, Shapiro was NPR's regional reporter in Atlanta and then in Miami. In 2003, he was an NPR reporting fellow at WBUR in Boston.

Shapiro is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale. He began his journalism career in 2001 in the office of NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg. Shapiro was born in Fargo, North Dakota, and grew up in Portland, Oregon.

 

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1:06am

Sun September 18, 2011
U.S.

Palestinian Statehood Bid Pits Obama Against Allies

Originally published on Mon September 26, 2011 11:30 am

President Obama addresses the Millennium Development Goals Summit at the United Nations headquarters in 2010.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

President Obama flies to New York on Monday for an annual presidential tradition that this year could become a diplomatic disaster.

It's the meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, when world leaders gather to address the world's problems. The Palestinians plan to ask the U.N. to recognize them as an independent state this week, which puts Obama on a collision course with some of America's closest allies.

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2:00am

Fri September 9, 2011
Economy

Nevada Group Watches Obama With Doubt

President Obama plans to take his job creation message to the American people in the coming weeks. Nevada has the highest unemployment rate in the country. A group of people, who are employed, watched Obama's speech, and most of them are not convinced his plan would create good long-term jobs.

2:00am

Wed September 7, 2011
Politics

Romney Plan Vows To Add 11 Million Jobs In 4 Years

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney on Tuesday laid out a wide-ranging economic proposal. Romney announced his plan inside a giant truck warehouse in Nevada.

10:01pm

Wed August 31, 2011
Politics

Labor's Criticism Of Obama Grows Louder

Organized labor is traditionally one of the strongest sources of money and organizing power for Democrats, but lately union leaders have strongly criticized President Obama.

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1:05pm

Tue August 30, 2011
Politics

Libya Offers Obama Vindication, But Not Doctrine

President Barack Obama addresses the 93rd American Legion National Convention at the Minneapolis Convention Center on Tuesday.
Cory Ryan Getty Images

While Libya's ultimate fate is still unclear, the past week has marked a decisive change. In a speech to the American Legion in Minneapolis Tuesday, President Obama praised "our brave forces who helped the Libyan people finally break free from the grip of Moammar Gadhafi."

The last five months brought a great deal of controversy and criticism to the White House's handling of Libya. Now the administration is claiming some vindication.

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