Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a producer who works with Morning Edition and NPR.org, coordinating with radio and digital media staff to create Web features that complement stories heard on-air. He also frequently writes original Web pieces.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to writing for its World Cup 2010 blog. Chappell's assignments have included being the lead Web producer on NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as being the Web liaison and producer of the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps project.

Chappell was an integral part of the team that executed a comprehensive redesign of NPR's Web site in 2009. One year later, the site won its first Peabody and the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award, among others.

Drawing from his experience in improving NPR's storytelling ability, he trains both digital media and radio staff in using NPR's digital tools.

Other shows he has worked with include Fresh Air, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation and Piano Jazz with Marilyn McPartland.

Prior to joining NPR in 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling regions from Asia and Africa to Europe and Latin America.

During the intensive early months of the Iraq War, he coordinated packages and live shots out of Qatar, Israel and Australia. During the war, he set up live interviews and brought in packages to supply content to CNN's global networks.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as Editor-in-Chief of the Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

Chappell's prior work included producing Web pages and editing digital video for CNNSI.com, as well as editing and producing news and features at CNN.com. His entry to CNN came via the network's central library, where he often manned the reference desk.

Chappell's entry into national journalism came after years of writing about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies. A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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7:19am

Wed August 10, 2011
The Two-Way

Philip Levine Named As America's New Poet Laureate

America's new poet laureate, Philip Levine, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1995. Here, he's seen in a file photo at the San Joaquin River Center in Fresno, Calif.
Gary Kazanjian AP

America has a new poet laureate today, as the Library of Congress names Philip Levine in the one-year position. He will succeed W.S. Merwin in the post. Born in Detroit in 1928, Levine has used his poetry to examine blue-collar life, often embroidering everyday events with a sense of myth.

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4:55pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

U.K. Riots Continue Outside London; Bookstores Soldier On

Fire rips through a retail store in Manchester, in northwest England, Tuesday, marking a fourth night of violence in Britain. Looters have targeted electronics and clothing stores.
Andrew Yates AFP/Getty Images

With 16,000 police officers out in full force in London's streets in an effort to put a stop to violent riots that have ravaged the city for three days, the British capital was "relatively calm" Tuesday, says the BBC.

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3:53pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

In U.S. Stock Market Rally, Apple Briefly Supplanted Exxon Mobil

A trader at the New York Stock Exchange watches a monitor moments before the Federal Reserve announced it would keep interest rates low through at least 2013. The news reassured investors and helped sustain a rally.
Mario Tama Getty Images

For evidence of the volatile swings of Tuesday's stock market, consider that for a bit, Apple became the most valuable American company, surpassing Exxon Mobil. The day's trading spanned 600 points, as investors rallied from two days of steep declines and digested new guidance from the Federal Reserve.

The S&P 500 index of large-cap U.S. companies saw its largest gain in two years, rising by nearly 5 percent. Just the day before, it had fallen by 6.7 percent.

For Newscast, Yuki Noguchi filed this report:

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3:06pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Official Is First To Attend Nagasaki Ceremony Marking Nuclear Strike

James Zumwalt, deputy chief of the U.S. embassy in Tokyo, offers a wreath of flowers at a ceremony marking the 66th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki.
AFP/Getty Images

A ceremonial bell tolled in Nagasaki, Japan, Tuesday morning, marking the beginning of a moment of silence to remember tens of thousands of people killed by an atomic bomb that fell from a U.S. plane 66 years ago. And for the first time, the ceremony was attended by a U.S. government official.

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2:06pm

Tue August 9, 2011
The Two-Way

Mysterious Orange Goo ID'ed As Eggs; Alaskan Village Still Worries

Scientists say the microscopic eggs, seen here under magnification, derive their orange color from a droplet of fat.
NOAA

A mysterious orange goo that appeared on the shore of a small village in Alaska has been identified as "millions of microscopic eggs filled with fatty droplets," the AP reports. But researchers say they still don't know what the eggs might hatch, or if they are toxic.

The mass of eggs began appearing last week, surprising even longtime residents of the village of Kivalina. Discovery News, which spoke with a town official, describes the goo:

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