Brian Naylor

After almost a decade spent reporting on Congress for NPR, Brian Naylor has turned his microphone toward the issues, people, and events of the Mid-Atlantic region. His coverage now encompasses developments in the area stretching from Pennsylvania through Virginia. In addition to his reports heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition, Naylor can be heard as a substitute host on NPR's newsmagazines.

As NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor documented the first Republican majority in Congress in 40 years, and filed many reports chronicling the 73-member year freshman class who, according to Naylor, were the driving force behind the revolution. Naylor was elected to the Executive Committee of the Congressional Radio/TV Gallery in 1995. His congressional work earned national praise; Naylor's stories were among those that won NPR the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award presented for political reporting in 1996. Before becoming NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor served as NPR's White House correspondent during the Reagan administration.

During his tenure at NPR, Naylor has also reported from abroad. He filed from London during the Gulf War and from Jerusalem in the aftermath of the Temple Mount shootings. He also covered the 1988 Olympics from Seoul. Naylor joined NPR in 1982 as a newscaster for All Things Considered. Before coming to NPR, Naylor served from 1979 to 1982 as State House/political reporter and anchor for WOSU-FM in Columbus, Ohio. Naylor has also worked at radio stations in Maine.

A native of Pound Ridge, NY, Naylor graduated from the University of Maine in 1978 with a bachelor's degree in broadcasting/film.

 

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5:07pm

Wed July 30, 2014
It's All Politics

As Wildfires Burn Through Funds, Washington Seeks New Way To Pay

A line of fire snakes along a hillside at dusk on July 18 in Winthrop, Wash., where a fire destroyed about 100 homes. Officials say that fire damage, overall, is down this summer, but that firefighting costs are skyrocketing.
Elaine Thompson AP

Though wildfires this summer have burned hundreds of homes and scorched thousands of square miles of land in Washington, Oregon and California, officials say that so far, this wildfire season could be worse.

But the cost of fighting those fires has skyrocketed, and the Obama administration and some in Congress say it's time to rethink how those dollars are spent.

In places like central Washington, watching the evening news has recently not been for the faint of heart, with daily broadcasts chronicling evacuations of local towns with the approach of "firestorms."

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4:01pm

Mon July 21, 2014
Politics

Sen. Alexander Outpaces Tea Party, But Remains In Its Cross Hairs

Originally published on Mon July 21, 2014 4:35 pm

State Rep. Joe Carr holds a news conference in Murfreesboro, Tenn. on Jan. 16, 2013. He is challenging incumbent Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander in the Republican primary.
Erik Schelzig AP

Tennessee's Lamar Alexander is one of a number of incumbent Republican senators caught in the cross hairs of Tea Party groups, taking on several challengers in next month's GOP primary.

But while Tea Party groups may be optimistic about the race, challengers like Joe Carr face an uphill battle to unseat the two-term senator.

Carr's campaign office is just across the street from Murfreesboro's antebellum courthouse. An American flag hangs out front, and in the window a big campaign sign calls on Tennessee Republicans to vote for "Carr, not Lamar."

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2:06pm

Wed July 2, 2014
NPR Story

For Interior Secretary, Getting Outdoors Is In The Job Description

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 5:57 pm

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell takes a tour of the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Townsend, Ga., last week with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge manager Kimberly Hayes.
Stephen B. Morton AP

It's rare to find Sally Jewell in her Washington, D.C., office.

A little more than a year into her job as Interior Department secretary, she spends much of her time out in the field. It's unavoidable for someone who heads the federal agency that oversees some 400 national parks and nearly 300 million acres of federal lands.

"It's in the job description," she says. "It's also a fun part of the job."

Of late, Jewell has been in the forefront of the administration's efforts to raise awareness of the threat of climate change.

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2:24pm

Mon June 23, 2014
Politics

In Oklahoma Senate Race, A Choice Between Two Deep Shades Of Red

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 6:07 pm

State Rep. T.W. Shannon (left) talks with U.S. Rep. James Lankford following a June 6 Republican candidate forum for the open U.S. Senate seat in Lawton, Okla.
Sue Ogrocki AP

In Oklahoma, Republicans will vote Tuesday on a nominee to finish the term of current GOP Sen. Tom Coburn, who is retiring at year-end with two years left to spare. For the two front-runners, Rep. James Lankford and former state House Speaker T.W. Shannon, immigration has suddenly become an issue in the race.

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2:02pm

Thu June 12, 2014
Politics

On The Hill, Debate Reawakens Over Tired Truckers

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Last weekend, a tractor-trailer hit a limo carrying comedian Tracy Morgan. He's still hospitalized, and comedian James McNair was killed. The truck driver had allegedly not slept for more than 24 hours. And despite the attention, the trucking industry is working to roll back a regulation, passed last year, regulating rest periods. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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