Brian Naylor

After almost a decade spent reporting on Congress for NPR, Brian Naylor has turned his microphone toward the issues, people, and events of the Mid-Atlantic region. His coverage now encompasses developments in the area stretching from Pennsylvania through Virginia. In addition to his reports heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition, Naylor can be heard as a substitute host on NPR's newsmagazines.

As NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor documented the first Republican majority in Congress in 40 years, and filed many reports chronicling the 73-member year freshman class who, according to Naylor, were the driving force behind the revolution. Naylor was elected to the Executive Committee of the Congressional Radio/TV Gallery in 1995. His congressional work earned national praise; Naylor's stories were among those that won NPR the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award presented for political reporting in 1996. Before becoming NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor served as NPR's White House correspondent during the Reagan administration.

During his tenure at NPR, Naylor has also reported from abroad. He filed from London during the Gulf War and from Jerusalem in the aftermath of the Temple Mount shootings. He also covered the 1988 Olympics from Seoul. Naylor joined NPR in 1982 as a newscaster for All Things Considered. Before coming to NPR, Naylor served from 1979 to 1982 as State House/political reporter and anchor for WOSU-FM in Columbus, Ohio. Naylor has also worked at radio stations in Maine.

A native of Pound Ridge, NY, Naylor graduated from the University of Maine in 1978 with a bachelor's degree in broadcasting/film.

 

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2:55pm

Fri March 20, 2015
It's All Politics

It's All About The Benjamins And Jacksons — But What About The Women?

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 5:58 pm

"There hasn't been a change of the portraits since 1929 ... it's time to bring our money into the 21st century," says Susan Ades Stone, spokeswoman for Women on 20s.
iStockPhoto

The college basketball playoffs have turned March into a month when many of us become bracket watchers. There is another playoff taking place that you may not have heard of — an online campaign to choose a woman to put on the $20 bill.

If you look into your wallet, whether you're feeling flush, or not, there's one thing the bills you do find all have in common ... the faces of dead white men. Most are presidents: Washington, Lincoln and Jackson. A few, Hamilton and Franklin among them, famous for other reasons. But not one of the faces is female.

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3:38am

Wed March 18, 2015
It's All Politics

War Criminals Next Door: Immigration Division Brings Violators To Justice

Originally published on Wed March 18, 2015 3:48 pm

Salvadoran Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova, shown in an undated photo, is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four Americans in 1980.
AP

An appeals panel in Florida has upheld a deportation order against a former defense minister of El Salvador, who is alleged to have presided over human rights violations in that country, including the murders of four American churchwomen in 1980. Gen. Carlos Eugenio Vides Casanova was allowed to retire in the U.S. in 1989. Now, a little known unit of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is trying to expel him as well as others charged with human rights abuses.

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4:03pm

Wed March 11, 2015
Politics

As Clinton Defends Email Policy, Department IG Finds Flaws

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 8:29 am

Then-U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton (center) types on her cellphone with Roberta S. Jacobson, U.S. assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere Affairs (left), and U.S. Ambassador to Brazil Thomas Shannon in Brasilia, Brazil, before heading to Brussels in 2012.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

A day after Hillary Clinton's explanation of her use of a private email account while secretary of state, a State Department watchdog reported that only a fraction of the department's emails have been preserved. The Inspector General's report says that of the 1 billion emails sent by State Department employees in 2011, just over 61,000 were kept.

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3:15pm

Mon March 2, 2015
Politics

Sen. Mikulski, Groundbreaker For Female Legislators, Won't Seek Re-Election

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 2:00 pm

Mikulski (left) and her then-opponent Linda Chavez hold hands before the Maryland Senate candidates debate in 1986.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

A surprise political announcement Monday — the longest-serving woman in Congress, Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland, said she will not seek re-election next year. Mikulski was first elected to the House in 1976, and 10 years later was elected to the Senate.

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3:16am

Thu February 26, 2015
It's All Politics

On Net Neutrality, Republicans Pitch Oversight Rather Than Regulation

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:37 am

Republicans in Congress are no fans of FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler's "net neutrality" plan.
Jose Luis Magana AP

The Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote Thursday morning to put more stringent regulations on Internet providers.

Backers, including many tech firms and the Obama administration, say the net neutrality rules will ensure equal access to the net for content providers. But Republicans in Congress are no fans of FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler's plan.

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