Brian Naylor

After almost a decade spent reporting on Congress for NPR, Brian Naylor has turned his microphone toward the issues, people, and events of the Mid-Atlantic region. His coverage now encompasses developments in the area stretching from Pennsylvania through Virginia. In addition to his reports heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition, Naylor can be heard as a substitute host on NPR's newsmagazines.

As NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor documented the first Republican majority in Congress in 40 years, and filed many reports chronicling the 73-member year freshman class who, according to Naylor, were the driving force behind the revolution. Naylor was elected to the Executive Committee of the Congressional Radio/TV Gallery in 1995. His congressional work earned national praise; Naylor's stories were among those that won NPR the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award presented for political reporting in 1996. Before becoming NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor served as NPR's White House correspondent during the Reagan administration.

During his tenure at NPR, Naylor has also reported from abroad. He filed from London during the Gulf War and from Jerusalem in the aftermath of the Temple Mount shootings. He also covered the 1988 Olympics from Seoul. Naylor joined NPR in 1982 as a newscaster for All Things Considered. Before coming to NPR, Naylor served from 1979 to 1982 as State House/political reporter and anchor for WOSU-FM in Columbus, Ohio. Naylor has also worked at radio stations in Maine.

A native of Pound Ridge, NY, Naylor graduated from the University of Maine in 1978 with a bachelor's degree in broadcasting/film.

 

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3:51pm

Wed June 27, 2012
Election 2012

Some Democrats To Skip Obama's Renomination Party

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 1:52 pm

Bank of America stadium in Charlotte, N.C., where President Obama will accept his party's nomination on Sept. 6.
Jeff Siner MCT/Landov

This summer's Democratic National Convention has already gotten shorter, shrinking from the traditional four-day extravaganza to three days. Now it appears the attendance for the event is shrinking, too.

At least a dozen Democrats say they won't be able to make it to Charlotte, N.C., when the convention begins Sept. 4. It's no coincidence that all are facing tough election campaigns in places where President Obama's popularity lags.

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3:46am

Sun June 17, 2012
Presidential Race

Campaign Ads Target Latinos As A Key Issue Looms

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

3:27pm

Mon June 11, 2012
Election 2012

Arizona Voters Choosing Gabby Giffords' Replacement

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 6:10 pm

Democrat Ron Barber (left) and Republican Jesse Kelly during a May 23 debate in Tucson. They are running Tuesday in a special election to replace retired Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.
Kelly Presnell Arizona Daily Star

Voters in southeastern Arizona go to the polls Tuesday in a special election to fill the rest of the congressional term of former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.

Giffords, a Democrat, resigned in January, a year after she was critically wounded in a shooting rampage. Running to fill the remaining six months of her term are her former aide, Ron Barber, and Republican Jesse Kelly, a businessman and Iraq War veteran.

The special election has echoes of the 2010 congressional campaign in the Tucson-based 8th Congressional District.

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1:27pm

Wed June 6, 2012
Election 2012

N.D. Senate Race Could Be Next National Battleground

Originally published on Wed June 6, 2012 5:29 pm

Democratic Senate candidate Heidi Heitkamp greets a supporter before a town hall meeting in Minot, N.D., on May 3.
Dale Wetzel AP

Republicans need a net pickup of four seats to win control of the U.S. Senate this November. One opportunity they see is in North Dakota, where longtime Democratic incumbent Kent Conrad has decided not to run for a sixth term.

Republican Rep. Rick Berg is expected to win the GOP nomination in next Tuesday's primary. If he does, he'll face Democrat Heidi Heitkamp.

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4:15am

Sat May 26, 2012
U.S.

Delayed At The Airport? They're Working On It

Originally published on Sat May 26, 2012 8:52 am

An air traffic controller works at the Atlanta TRACON, or terminal radar approach control, facility in Peachtree City, Ga. The FAA's NextGen program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.
David Goldman AP

When the summer travel season begins, airline passengers typically brace for delays as vacationers fly in larger numbers and the inevitable weather-related disruptions occur.

The Federal Aviation Administration, which oversees the nationwide system of air traffic control, is hoping to make some of those delays a thing of the past. It's developing what it calls "Next Generation" technology. The NextGen program will modernize the air traffic control system, transforming it from radar to GPS-based technology.

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