Brian Naylor

After almost a decade spent reporting on Congress for NPR, Brian Naylor has turned his microphone toward the issues, people, and events of the Mid-Atlantic region. His coverage now encompasses developments in the area stretching from Pennsylvania through Virginia. In addition to his reports heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition, Naylor can be heard as a substitute host on NPR's newsmagazines.

As NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor documented the first Republican majority in Congress in 40 years, and filed many reports chronicling the 73-member year freshman class who, according to Naylor, were the driving force behind the revolution. Naylor was elected to the Executive Committee of the Congressional Radio/TV Gallery in 1995. His congressional work earned national praise; Naylor's stories were among those that won NPR the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award presented for political reporting in 1996. Before becoming NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor served as NPR's White House correspondent during the Reagan administration.

During his tenure at NPR, Naylor has also reported from abroad. He filed from London during the Gulf War and from Jerusalem in the aftermath of the Temple Mount shootings. He also covered the 1988 Olympics from Seoul. Naylor joined NPR in 1982 as a newscaster for All Things Considered. Before coming to NPR, Naylor served from 1979 to 1982 as State House/political reporter and anchor for WOSU-FM in Columbus, Ohio. Naylor has also worked at radio stations in Maine.

A native of Pound Ridge, NY, Naylor graduated from the University of Maine in 1978 with a bachelor's degree in broadcasting/film.

 

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10:38am

Mon July 25, 2011
National Security

With Modesty In Mind, TSA Rolls Out New Body Scans

The new Automated Target Recognition software eliminates passenger-specific images and replaces them with generic outlines.
Courtesy of Transportation Security Administration

Beginning in 2007, full-body scanners were installed at the nation's airports to address concerns that terrorists could smuggle explosives hidden in their clothing — or, in one infamous case, their underwear — that wouldn't be picked up by standard metal detectors.

The scanners produced a fairly detailed image of a traveler's body, which was viewed on monitors by TSA screeners in a separate room.

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1:36pm

Mon July 18, 2011
Politics

Debt Ceiling Debate Sparks New Round Of TV Ad Wars

Pedestrians stop to view the National Debt Clock in New York this April. The debt ceiling is becoming an election issue, as groups on both sides spend millions on TV ads.
Andrew Harrer Bloomberg via Getty Images

The debate over raising the debt ceiling has largely taken place in the halls of Congress and the White House briefing room. But there is another front in the battle — a war on the air. Advocacy groups from each side of the issue are spending millions on commercials.

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4:33pm

Wed July 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Many First Responders Still Struggle To Communicate

Firefighters in the nation's capital (shown near the White House in 2004), have some fairly sophisticated communications devices. But those devices use the same commercial networks as D.C.-area residents. In an emergency, those networks can get crowded.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

After Sept. 11, there were widespread reports that public safety agencies responding to the attacks on the World Trade Center had trouble talking to one another. The problem: incompatible radios.

It was a common challenge among public service agencies nationwide. Different first responders had different radios operating on different frequencies. Billions of dollars later, federal, state and local governments have largely solved that challenge.

But many first responders still lack access to the kind of technology that many Americans carry on their waistbands or bags.

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4:00am

Thu June 16, 2011
Politics

Rep. Weiner Could Lose N.Y. District In Redistricting

Democratic Party leaders have been suggesting Rep. Anthony Weiner resign from his New York seat. If Weiner decides to stay, the party has another option, it could redistrict him out. Because New York's population has not increased on a pace with other states, it will lose two congressional districts. One is likely to come from the New York City area.

12:01am

Mon June 6, 2011
Around the Nation

New Storms, Prior Disasters Burden FEMA's Budget

As the government copes with this spring's plague of tornadoes and flooding in the Midwest and South, it is still responding to disasters of previous years.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency continues to fund rebuilding projects related to Hurricane Katrina and other major storms in the past. This has caused some cash flow problems at FEMA.

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