Brian Naylor

After almost a decade spent reporting on Congress for NPR, Brian Naylor has turned his microphone toward the issues, people, and events of the Mid-Atlantic region. His coverage now encompasses developments in the area stretching from Pennsylvania through Virginia. In addition to his reports heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition, Naylor can be heard as a substitute host on NPR's newsmagazines.

As NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor documented the first Republican majority in Congress in 40 years, and filed many reports chronicling the 73-member year freshman class who, according to Naylor, were the driving force behind the revolution. Naylor was elected to the Executive Committee of the Congressional Radio/TV Gallery in 1995. His congressional work earned national praise; Naylor's stories were among those that won NPR the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award presented for political reporting in 1996. Before becoming NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor served as NPR's White House correspondent during the Reagan administration.

During his tenure at NPR, Naylor has also reported from abroad. He filed from London during the Gulf War and from Jerusalem in the aftermath of the Temple Mount shootings. He also covered the 1988 Olympics from Seoul. Naylor joined NPR in 1982 as a newscaster for All Things Considered. Before coming to NPR, Naylor served from 1979 to 1982 as State House/political reporter and anchor for WOSU-FM in Columbus, Ohio. Naylor has also worked at radio stations in Maine.

A native of Pound Ridge, NY, Naylor graduated from the University of Maine in 1978 with a bachelor's degree in broadcasting/film.

 

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3:28pm

Wed May 8, 2013
Politics

Push To End Teens' Distracted Driving Targets Parents, Peers

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 3:55 pm

A screengrab from Brittany Anne Devasure's winning Project Yellow Light video, aimed at discouraging distracted driving.
YouTube

2:29pm

Mon May 6, 2013
It's All Politics

Some Democrats Back Same-Sex Amendment To Immigration Bill

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 7:00 pm

Some Democrats want to amend the immigration bill before the Senate to allow foreign-born same-sex spouses of Americans to qualify for green cards.
Jason Reed Reuters/Landov

The immigration overhaul bill before the Senate would provide, among other things, more visas for migrant farm workers and high-tech workers, and a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States.

One thing it would not provide is help for same-sex couples in which one partner is an American and one foreign-born. For heterosexual couples, a foreign-born spouse automatically qualifies for a green card and many of the benefits of citizenship. Not so with gay and lesbian couples.

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3:07pm

Wed April 24, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Boston Response Praised, But Intelligence-Sharing Questioned

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 2:57 pm

First responders aid injured people at the finish line of the Boston Marathon after the bombing on April 15.
Charles Krupa AP

In the days since the Boston Marathon bombings, local law enforcement officials have been given high marks for their response to the attack and the coordination among numerous federal, state and local agencies involved.

But at the same time, questions are being raised about the coordination among federal agencies handling intelligence they had about the suspects in the months before the attack.

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4:03pm

Mon April 22, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Boston Lockdown 'Extraordinary' But Prudent, Experts Say

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 7:52 pm

A sign on I-93 alerts motorists that Boston is under a "shelter in place" order Friday.
Elise Amendola AP

Local officials have defended the decision to essentially lock down the city of Boston on Friday while law enforcement searched for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing.

Residents were told to remain indoors during the hunt for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who survived an early morning shootout with police in the suburb of Watertown during which his brother, Tamerlan, was killed.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick announced the decision to lock down Watertown and the surrounding areas, including Boston, at a dawn news conference Friday.

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2:34pm

Wed April 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Some States Hike Gas Tax; Va. Tries New Route To Fund Roads

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 5:19 pm

Drivers travel on Interstate 495, the Capital Beltway, near Tysons Corner in Fairfax County, Va., in November, just days before the opening of four new express lanes. Virginia is among 19 states that have approved or are considering legislation to increase transportation funding, according to Transportation for America.
Cliff Owen AP

It's no secret that many of the nation's roads are in pretty bad shape. In the latest report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the condition of America's highways rated a grade of D.

Congestion is a big problem, and so is upkeep. Most states rely on gas taxes to raise the money for repairs and new construction, but that funding source is not the stream it used to be, says James Corless of Transportation for America.

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