Carrie Johnson

Carrie Johnson covers the Justice Department for NPR.

She has spent the last decade and a half chronicling legal affairs in the nation's capital and beyond. Johnson worked at the Washington Post from 2000 to 2010, when she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Johnson's work has won awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois. She lives in Washington but always is planning her next exotic trip.

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12:01am

Tue March 29, 2011
Law

U.S. Civil Rights Division In The Hot Seat, Again

Conservatives have made no secret of how they feel about the Obama administration's approach to civil rights. Republican analysts have been pointing out examples of what they call major overreach for almost two years.

"Instead of filing the really traditional kinds of cases the division has always gone after, where there's real discrimination going on, they are trying to push and stretch the laws to reach areas the laws were not intended to cover," says Hans von Spakovsky, who worked at the civil rights division in the George W. Bush Justice Department.

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12:01am

Fri March 25, 2011
U.S.

Who Will Become The Next Director Of The FBI?

Over the next several weeks, the Obama administration will have a big decision on its hands: choosing the next director of the FBI. The 10-year term of the FBI's current leader, Robert Mueller, expires in September. A committee is already searching for candidates to replace him.

Mueller became the FBI director in September 2001, days before the terrorist attacks that would change the bureau's direction. President Bush had an order for his national security team back then: Don't ever let this happen again.

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12:05pm

Thu March 24, 2011
The Two-Way

FBI Gives Agents More Leeway To Question Terrorism Suspects

The FBI has told agents they can question terrorism suspects for a longer amount of time before reading them their Miranda rights if the suspects are giving the agents valuable intelligence and public safety is at risk. The move follows criticism from Republican lawmakers about the Justice Department's handling of recent national security cases.

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12:01am

Thu March 24, 2011
Around the Nation

U.S. Overhauls Approach To BP Spill Probe

Almost a year after the huge oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the Obama administration is still working to determine who's criminally responsible. Justice Department leaders quietly overhauled their approach earlier this month, creating a special task force and putting a veteran mob prosecutor in charge.

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5:15pm

Tue March 22, 2011
Around the Nation

'Keep Them Safe': Feds Seek To Stem Police Deaths

Justice Department leaders met in Washington on Tuesday to talk about an alarming increase in the number of law enforcement officers dying in the line of duty.

It's the second year in a row the rate of fatalities has risen sharply, and the federal government is asking what it can do to help.

For Attorney General Eric Holder, the issue has hit home. Holder has attended memorial services for officers killed in the line of duty three times already this year.

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