Elise Hu

Elise Hu is a reporter who covers the intersection of technology and culture for NPR's on-air, online and multimedia platforms.

She joined NPR in 2011 to coordinate the digital development and editorial vision for the StateImpact network, a state government reporting project focused on member stations.

Before joining NPR, she was one of the founding reporters who helped launch The Texas Tribune, a non-profit digital news startup devoted to politics and public policy. While at the Tribune, Hu oversaw television partnerships and multimedia projects; contributed to The New York Times' expanded Texas coverage and pushed for editorial innovation across platforms.

An honors graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia's School of Journalism, she previously worked as the state political reporter for KVUE-TV in Austin, WYFF-TV in Greenville, SC, and reported from Asia for the Taipei Times.

Her work has earned a Gannett Foundation Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, a National Edward R. Murrow award for best online video, beat reporting awards from the Texas Associated Press and The Austin Chronicle once dubiously named her the "Best TV Reporter Who Can Write."

Outside of work, Hu is an adjunct instructor at Northwestern University and Georgetown University's journalism schools. She's also an adviser to the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where she keeps up with emerging media and technology as a panelist for the Knight News Challenge.

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2:12pm

Mon October 21, 2013
All Tech Considered

The HealthCare.gov 'Tech Surge' Is Racing Against The Clock

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 8:10 am

HealthCare.gov has been plagued with problems since the health insurance exchange site opened Oct. 1.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

A "tech surge" is underway to help clean up the code of the error-plagued HealthCare.gov site.

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12:09pm

Fri September 27, 2013
All Tech Considered

Phantom Phone Vibrations: So Common They've Changed Our Brains?

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 8:09 pm

Phantom Vibration Syndrome: That phenomenon where you think your phone is vibrating when it's not.
iStockphoto.com

Phantom vibration — that phenomenon where you think your phone is vibrating but it's not — has been around only since the mobile age. And five years ago, when its wider existence became recognized, news organizations, including ours, covered the "syndrome" as a sign of the digital encroachment in our lives. Today, it's so common that researchers have devoted studies to it.

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2:32pm

Wed August 28, 2013
All Tech Considered

Outage Summer: What To Know About The Syrian Electronic Army

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:39 pm

The New York Times headquarters building in New York City.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

In the latest hacking that brought down The New York Times on Tuesday, evidence points to the activist group of hackers known as the Syrian Electronic Army. This group also took out The Washington Post briefly last week and has used phishing attacks to take control of NPR.org and other national news organizations in previous months. The Washington Post notes:

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1:16pm

Mon August 26, 2013
All Tech Considered

'I'd Tap That' And Other NSA Pickup Lines Are All The Rage

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:58 pm

An anti-NSA protester in Washington, DC.
Steve Rhodes Flickr

News that National Security Agency officers sometimes abuse domestic intelligence gathering practices to monitor potential love interests has led to a sweeping, satirical response by The People of The Internet. On Tumblr and Twitter, the #NSAPickupLines and #NSALovePoems hashtags have sparked all sorts of creativity from users poking fun at the potential intrusion of the NSA into our personal lives.

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12:46pm

Mon August 19, 2013
All Tech Considered

The End Of Buttons: The New Gesture-Control Era

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 4:58 pm

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