Frank James

Frank James joined NPR News in April 2009 to launch the blog, "The Two-Way," with co-blogger Mark Memmott.

"The Two-Way" is the place where NPR.org gives readers breaking news and analysis — and engages users in conversations ("two-ways") about the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

James came to NPR from the Chicago Tribune, where he worked for 20 years. In 2006, James created "The Swamp," the paper's successful politics and policy news blog whose readership climbed to a peak of 3 million page-views a month.

Before that, James covered homeland security, technology and privacy and economics in the Tribune's Washington Bureau. He also reported for the Tribune from South Africa and covered politics and higher education.

James also reported for The Wall Street Journal for nearly 10 years.

James received a bachelor of arts degree in English from Dickinson College and now serves on its board of trustees.

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6:28pm

Mon March 14, 2011
It's All Politics

Miami Poised To Oust Mayor Carlos Alvarez Over Tax Hikes

By all indicators, Miami voters look like they're going to throw Mayor Carlos Alvarez out of office Tuesday.

The sin that proved the last straw for voters? The Republican mayor raised property taxes.

And, according to Alvarez, he got on the wrong side of billionaire car dealer Norman Braman by building a new baseball stadium for the MLB's Florida Marlins which was connected to another tax hike, a boost in the hotel tax.

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4:38pm

Thu March 10, 2011
It's All Politics

House GOP Readies $6 Billion, 3-Week Spending Bill: Report

House Republicans plan to unveil on Friday a new stopgap spending bill that would last three weeks and cut federal spending for that time period by $6 billion, according to a report by The Hill news organization.

The Hill attributes the information to Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho), a member of the House Appropriations Committee and a subcommittee chair.

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12:28pm

Wed March 9, 2011
It's All Politics

Newt Gingrich Seems To Blame Past Personal Lapses On Patriotism

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich can't avoid the reality that his personal past is a problem in Republican primaries and caucuses where social conservative activists, including born-again Christians, will play a large role in choosing who eventually becomes the Republican nominee.

So his challenge is to arrive at a formulation that explains some of that controversial behavior, including the extramarital affair that led to his third and current marriage.

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5:22pm

Tue March 8, 2011
It's All Politics

NPR Should Get No More Taxpayer Funding: House GOP's Cantor

The congressional effort to end federal funding for NPR received new impetus Tuesday after a video surfaced of an executive who was the public-radio network's top fundraising official when he made controversial remarks about Republicans, conservatives and the Tea Party movement.

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4:35pm

Tue March 8, 2011
It's All Politics

Wisconsin's Gov. Walker Shows Signs Of Yielding On Some Labor Provisions

Aides to Wisconsin's Republican Gov. Scott Walker have been in talks with state senate Democrats in which the Republican position appears to be softening, according to e-mails obtained by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

According to the e-mails, while the governor's office still wants limits to collective bargaining, it's willing to allow more issues to come under such bargaining than initially the case.

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