Frank James

Frank James joined NPR News in April 2009 to launch the blog, "The Two-Way," with co-blogger Mark Memmott.

"The Two-Way" is the place where NPR.org gives readers breaking news and analysis — and engages users in conversations ("two-ways") about the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

James came to NPR from the Chicago Tribune, where he worked for 20 years. In 2006, James created "The Swamp," the paper's successful politics and policy news blog whose readership climbed to a peak of 3 million page-views a month.

Before that, James covered homeland security, technology and privacy and economics in the Tribune's Washington Bureau. He also reported for the Tribune from South Africa and covered politics and higher education.

James also reported for The Wall Street Journal for nearly 10 years.

James received a bachelor of arts degree in English from Dickinson College and now serves on its board of trustees.

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5:11pm

Thu March 3, 2011
It's All Politics

Wisconsin Gov. Walker: Layoffs Start Friday Unless Democrats Return

Wisconsin's political and governing crisis went from bad to worse Thursday.

In what had the feel of a hostage drama, with state workers as the bug-eyed captives, Republican Gov. Scott Walker threatened to start layoffs on Friday if his budget-repair bill wasn't passed.

But it would take the 14 Democratic senators who fled Wisconsin for Illinois to return; all indications were they weren't about to.

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2:31pm

Thu March 3, 2011
It's All Politics

Boehner Should Face Primary Challenge: Top Tea Party Activist

Signs abound of the pressures on Speaker John Boehner and other House Republicans to show real results on spending cuts.

An NBC/Wall Street Journal poll found, for instance, that those voters focused on spending cuts are the voters who matter most to Republicans — their base.

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12:17pm

Wed March 2, 2011
It's All Politics

Gov. Chris Christie Knows He 'Could Win,' Still Won't Run

When Sen. Barack Obama was still in his first year in the U.S. Senate, Illinois' senior senator, Sen. Dick Durbin, famously told him to seize the moment and run for the presidency.

"Do you really think sticking around the Senate for four more years and casting a thousand more votes will make you more qualified for president?" Durbin asked Obama?

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