Grace Hood

Reporter

I’ve been a listener of NPR for as long as I can remember. I grew up listening to Iowa Public Radio in Davenport, Iowa, and then tuned in to WHYY when I attended Bryn Mawr College outside of Philadelphia.

I began my career as a journalist in the print medium. As a general assignment reporter at the Boulder Weekly, I covered politics, the environment, agriculture, and sports. I won multiple Society for Professional Journalism awards, including first place honors for Best Political Feature Writing and Best Science/Agricultural Feature.

I began experimenting with sound and radio at my local Boulder community radio station, KGNU. I still remember the first story that I did for the station—about a “weed management” program by the city of Boulder in which it hired goat herders to graze their animals in weed-infested fields. The sounds I recorded brought the story alive in a way I had never experienced before. At that point—the summer of 2007—I was hooked. I had to do more stories for radio.

During my tenure at KUNC, I've been recognized by the Colorado Broadcaster's Association, Associated Press and RTDNA for my radio feature stories. I've received three national Edward R. Murrow awards, in 2010, 2011, and 2012 for feature and investigative reporting. In 2012 I received the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize.

As a reporter at KUNC, my goal is to bring the voices of ordinary people to the airwaves—not just those of spokespeople or individuals in positions of power.  I look forward to serving the region of Northern Colorado and meeting many of you in my journalistic travels. I also welcome feedback and story ideas, so don’t hesitate to drop me a line via e-mail.

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4:01pm

Tue August 26, 2014
Marijuna

Brush Businessman Keeps Defunct Prison Pot Grow Efforts Alive

Colorado's High Plains Correctional Facility sits just north of Brush, Colorado.
Grace Hood KUNC

Brush leaders have blocked efforts from a local entrepreneur to turn an old prison into a spot for researching and growing marijuana. But that's not stopping Nick Erker from pursuing another path for approval for his plan.

"In the privacy of the voting booth, I think we're going to get to see how people really feel about this," said the Brush-based owner of Colorado Farm Products.

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5:00am

Sat August 23, 2014
Transportation

No More Freebies: Fort Collins’ MAX Bus To Start Charging

Grace Hood KUNC

August 23 marks the last day of free rides along the Fort Collins bus rapid transit system. Starting August 25, the city will begin charging riders $1.25 for trips along the Mason Street corridor.

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5:00am

Fri August 22, 2014
Reporter's Notebook

Boom And Bust Along Colorado's Pawnee Pioneer Trails Byway

Colorado has 25 historic and scenic byways, the Pawnee Pioneer Trails are 128 miles found on the eastern plains.
Grace Hood KUNC

Small town, rural life has always fascinated me. I’ve met Coloradans who find the wide, open skies of the plains compelling. There’s something about the feeling you get from just being there, they say.

To get a sense of this region, I decided to drive along the Pawnee Pioneer Trails Scenic Byway.

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5:00am

Fri August 15, 2014
Mile High Life

Who’s Colorado Native? Not As Many As You’d Think

This worn native bumper sticker is surely a sign of a longtime Coloradan. Sames goes for the Moe's sticker. Only the Chicago Blackhawks sticker calls their status into question.
John Fischer Creative Commons

As Colorado’s population steadily rises, many are quick to sport their “native” bumper stickers. The older the Subaru and rattier the bumper sticker, the better the bragging rights. It turns out though that Colorado is one of the most diverse when it comes to domestic migration.

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3:10pm

Mon August 4, 2014
Politics

Reaction To Hickenlooper Oil And Gas Compromise Mixed

A drilling rig works north of Highway 392 east of Windsor.
Grace Hood KUNC

At a hastily organized news conference, Gov. John Hickenlooper called on all groups promoting oil and gas ballot issues to drop their proposals. To solve Colorado’s growing conflicts between development and land use, Hickenlooper proposed an 18-person blue ribbon commission composed of residents, local officials, oil and gas industry representatives as well as “respected Coloradans.”

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