Hansi Lo Wang

Hansi Lo Wang is a reporter covering race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's new Code Switch team.

Based in Washington, D.C., he previously served as a production assistant for NPR's Weekend Edition and was awarded the NPR Kroc Fellowship, during which he reported for NPR's National Desk and Seattle public radio station KUOW.

A Philadelphia native, Wang founded a radio reporting program for high school students in Philadelphia's Chinatown in 2008. He has also worked as a refugee housing coordinator.

He graduated with a bachelor's degree in political science from Swarthmore College. As a student, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly, student-run program on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a native Chinese speaker of both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects.

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5:01pm

Tue July 1, 2014
Code Switch

Language Barriers Pose Challenges For Mayan Migrant Children

Originally published on Tue July 1, 2014 5:43 pm

Hugo Pascual Tomas Manuel, 15, attends English classes at the Guatemalan-Maya Center in Lake Worth, Fla. He grew up speaking Q'anjob'al, or Kanjobal, an indigenous Mayan language.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Among the tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors who have come from Central America this year are children who speak little or no Spanish. Many are from Guatemala's indigenous communities, who speak more than 20 different Mayan languages.

Rafael Domingo, 16, grew up in Guatemala speaking Q'anjob'al, sometimes referred to as Kanjobal. The youngest son of a single mother, he rode a bus, walked for miles and crossed a river before he was stopped at the Texas border.

"It was so difficult to come to this country," Domingo says through an interpreter.

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6:57am

Sat June 14, 2014
Code Switch

50 Years Ago, Freedom Summer Began By Training For Battle

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 4:51 pm

Freedom Summer activists sing before leaving training sessions at Western College for Women in Oxford, Ohio, for Mississippi in June 1964.
Ted Polumbaum Collection Newseum

Idealism drove hundreds of college students to Mississippi 50 years ago.

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2:22pm

Mon June 2, 2014
Remembrances

Civil Rights Activist Yuri Kochiyama Dies At 93

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 2:36 pm

Prominent activist Yuri Kochiyama has died of natural causes at 93. The civil rights champion successfully fought for reparations to be paid to Japanese-Americans interned during World War II.

5:23am

Tue May 20, 2014
Code Switch

Oklahoma's Latino Community Prepares For The Next Tornado

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 9:43 am

Gloria and Francisco Sanchez stand in front of their new ranch house, still under construction a year after a tornado destroyed their last home in Moore, Okla.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

A devastating EF-5 tornado ripped through Moore, Okla., a year ago Tuesday. Just 11 days later, another twister ravaged the Oklahoma City metro area.

Nine of the 23 people who died as a result of the second storm were members of the local Latino community. Their deaths have sparked efforts to better prepare Hispanic families for storms.

On a windy afternoon in Oklahoma City, American Red Cross volunteer Ivelisse Cruz hands out stickers to families at the Children's Day Festival.

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10:24am

Sun May 18, 2014
Code Switch

The American Story, As It Was Reported To The Rest Of The Nation

A display of America's first ethnic newspapers at the Newseum's new exhibit, "One Nation With News For All." The exhibit opened on May 16 and runs through Jan. 5, 2015.
Jonathan Thompson/Newseum

The first draft of American history has many authors.

And they include journalists from ethnic media: newspapers, websites, radio and TV stations dedicated to reporting news for immigrant and ethnic communities.

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