Ina Jaffe

Ina Jaffe is a National desk correspondent based at NPR West, NPR's production center in Los Angeles. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR newsmagazines including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Covering California and the West, Jaffe has reported on nearly all of the major news events, elections, and natural disasters in the region. She also reports on national stories, such as the 2008 presidential campaign and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.

In addition to captivating and informing listeners, Jaffe's reports have garnered critical acclaim. Her three-part series on California’s Three Strikes sentencing law won the 2010 Silver Gavel Award from the American Bar Association and the Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. For her coverage of California politics, Jaffe received the California Journalism Award in 2002 and again in 2003 for reporting on minority political power in Los Angeles and the historic recall election that made Arnold Schwarzenegger governor.

Before moving to Los Angeles, Jaffe was the first editor of Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon which made its debut in 1985. As Weekend Edition Saturday editor, Jaffe shared a 1988 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for the report "A State of Emergency" which covered racial conflict in Philadelphia.

Born in Chicago, Jaffe and attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison and DePaul University receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees in philosophy, respectively.

 

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5:04am

Mon December 9, 2013
Politics

Will Seniors Leave Republicans Out To Dry In 2014?

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 6:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Some of the Republican Party's most reliable support has come from voters over the age of 65. But a recent survey suggests this could be changing.

NPR's Ina Jaffe went to the Palm Springs to look at a congressional race where we might be seeing this change play out.

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2:29pm

Thu November 21, 2013
NPR Story

Homeless Population Shrinks Again, But Unevenly

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 4:54 pm

The number of homeless people in the U.S. has declined for the third straight year. New numbers from the Department of Housing and Urban Development show a large decrease in the number of homeless veterans. Though there are still large numbers of homeless, mainly concentrated in large cities, including New York City and Los Angeles.

3:28am

Sat November 16, 2013
Health

Despite Early Stages, Alzheimer's Affects Couple's Big Picture

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 9:22 am

Pansy Greene, 73, is in the early stages of Alzheimer's. She and her husband, Winston, have been married for 57 years. She says her secret to maintaining a normal life is to stay active and positive.
David P. Gilkey NPR

NPR has been following Pansy and Winston Greene, a California couple struggling with an Alzheimer's diagnosis. Three years ago, Pansy learned she had Alzheimer's disease, and over this past summer, the couple told NPR that their day-to-day lives haven't changed much. That's still true. But on this second visit, they each seem to be looking at the future a bit differently.

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2:22am

Wed October 30, 2013
Around the Nation

Arguments Over Social Security Pit Old Vs. Young

Originally published on Thu October 31, 2013 3:24 am

iStockphoto.com

Congress has until Jan. 15 to come up with another spending plan. As they negotiate, one thing you'll hear a lot about is overhauling entitlement programs — particularly Social Security.

The program accounts for about 20 percent of federal spending. One argument in favor of cuts is that Social Security amounts to a huge transfer of wealth from the young to the old.

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5:02pm

Mon October 7, 2013
Shots - Health News

Delaying Aging May Have A Bigger Payoff Than Fighting Disease

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 5:24 pm

Gaining a few more years of healthy life would be great for individuals, but expensive for Medicare, researchers say.
iStockphoto.com

Curing cancer and eliminating heart disease has been the holy grail of medical research. But there could be even greater benefits if aging itself could be delayed, a study finds.

This is not quite as farfetched as it sounds. While the anti-aging "cures" being marketed these days are largely snake oil, in the laboratory scientists have managed to extend the lives of laboratory animals. And they have a better understanding of the mechanisms of biological aging.

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