Ina Jaffe

Ina Jaffe is a National desk correspondent based at NPR West, NPR's production center in Los Angeles. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR newsmagazines including Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Covering California and the West, Jaffe has reported on nearly all of the major news events, elections, and natural disasters in the region. She also reports on national stories, such as the 2008 presidential campaign and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.

In addition to captivating and informing listeners, Jaffe's reports have garnered critical acclaim. Her three-part series on California’s Three Strikes sentencing law won the 2010 Silver Gavel Award from the American Bar Association and the Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists. For her coverage of California politics, Jaffe received the California Journalism Award in 2002 and again in 2003 for reporting on minority political power in Los Angeles and the historic recall election that made Arnold Schwarzenegger governor.

Before moving to Los Angeles, Jaffe was the first editor of Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon which made its debut in 1985. As Weekend Edition Saturday editor, Jaffe shared a 1988 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for the report "A State of Emergency" which covered racial conflict in Philadelphia.

Born in Chicago, Jaffe and attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison and DePaul University receiving Bachelor's and Master's degrees in philosophy, respectively.

 

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3:17am

Sat June 29, 2013
Health

Despite Alzheimer's, Couple Holds Tight To Old Memories

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 1:44 pm

The Greenes say they take it a day at a time and relish the many long-term memories they've shared for nearly 60 years.
David Gilkey NPR

Right now, 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. One of them is 73-year-old Pansy Greene. She's in the early stages of Alzheimer's, and she and her husband, Winston, want people to know that so far, their daily lives have changed little despite the diagnosis.

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3:33pm

Fri June 7, 2013
Around the Nation

Plug Pulled On California Nuclear Plant, For Good

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 6:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Southern California, a nuclear power plant that supplied energy to more than a million homes is shutting down for good. As NPR's Ina Jaffe reports, the San Onofre nuclear plant has been idle for repair since January of 2012.

INA JAFFE, BYLINE: The twin, white domes at the San Onofre nuclear power plant have been landmarks on the California coast for more than four decades.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTESTERS CHANTING)

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2:25pm

Wed April 10, 2013
Law

A Mother's Fight Against 3 Strikes Law 'A Way of Life'

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 5:19 pm

Sue Reams campaigned to change California's three-strikes law and help set free her son, Shane.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Since the November election, 240 California prisoners facing potential life sentences have been set free. That's because voters changed California's tough three strikes sentencing law.

As NPR reported in 2009, that law sent thousands of people to prison for terms of 25 years to life for minor, nonviolent crimes. Now those prisoners can ask the court to have their sentences reduced.

One of those set free under the new law is Shane Reams. He owes his freedom in no small part to his mother Sue's 17-year campaign to change the law.

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7:15am

Mon April 1, 2013
Arts & Life

'A Lovely Feeling': Celebrating Older Women With Fabulous Style

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:50 am

Ilona Royce Smithkin, 93, cut her red hair to make her eyelashes.
Courtesy of Ari Seth Cohen

The fashion industry is sometimes criticized for unrealistic portrayals of young women. But if you're a woman older than 60, there are almost no portrayals, realistic or otherwise. Fashion may be something you have to invent more than follow. A blog called Advanced Style focuses on women who've done just that.

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1:55am

Thu March 14, 2013
Working Late: Older Americans On The Job

A Retired Chicago Cop's Second Act Is At A Barbershop

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 6:43 pm

Richard Piña, 69, with customer Augustin Bustos at Rich's Den barbershop in Calumet City, Ill. Piña, who retired from the Chicago police force 12 years ago, works at his shop four or five hours a day.
Beth Rooney for NPR

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

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