Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is based in Denver where he files reports on the energy industry as well as Western issues, politics and culture. He travels the country for NPR and spent many months covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

In 2006, Brady's reporting helped restart a federal car-titling system that had long been stymied by business interests. Once fully implemented, the Department of Justice estimates the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTS) will save U.S. car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He's also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter; and commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady discovered NPR in the late 1980s while running his small grocery store in Southern Oregon. "Customers often wanted to discuss current events. It was interesting, but I didn't know much. So I started reading the paper and listening to NPR to learn more," says Brady.

In 1989, he volunteered at the local NPR member station, Jefferson Public Radio, answering phones during a pledge drive and then running errands for the office staff until they let him in the newsroom.

Brady graduated from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University) in 1995 and has worked as a journalist since then.

If there’s a specific story you think Brady should consider covering, he can be reached on Facebook and Twitter, where he regularly posts stories related to his beats.

 

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10:01pm

Thu January 5, 2012
It's All Politics

Rick Santorum: The Underdog With A Loud Bark

Rick Santorum receives a call at his campaign headquarters during his Senate re-election bid in 2006. The former senator was attempting to keep his Pennsylvania Senate seat, which he later lost to Democrat Bob Casey, Jr.
Jeff Swensen Getty Images

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum is campaigning in New Hampshire after finishing a very close second in the Iowa caucuses. His success in the Hawkeye State was a surprise because Santorum was polling in the single digits there just a few weeks back.

For Santorum, surprising the political establishment is nothing new. Since he was first elected to Congress in 1990 — at 32 years old — Santorum has made a career out of being the underdog and usually winning.

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10:01pm

Wed January 4, 2012
Energy

Solar Panels Compete With Cheap Natural Gas

Barbara Scott and Mac Given in Media, Pa., had 21 solar panels installed last March. With government rebates and tax incentives, Scott says, her family spent $21,000 to install the system.
Jeff Brady NPR

Renewable energy is growing rapidly in the U.S., with wind and solar industries enjoying double-digit growth each year. Part of that growth comes from more homeowners choosing to install solar panels.

With government subsidies, some people can even make a financial argument for installing the panels. But in recent years, the price of one fossil fuel — natural gas — has declined so much that solar panels are having difficulty competing.

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11:37am

Thu December 29, 2011
Business

Gas Pains? U.S. Diesel, Gas Exports Surpass Imports

For the first time in more than six decades, the United States is exporting more gasoline and diesel than it imports.

To be clear, we're talking about finished petroleum products, not crude oil. The U.S. still imports about half the crude it consumes.

Refineries are touting this new export statistic — after all, gasoline and diesel are manufactured products. They say a boost in exports keeps more manufacturing jobs in the U.S. But one reason exports are increasing is that demand for gas in this country is declining.

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6:00am

Sat December 17, 2011
Around the Nation

Penn State Officials Face Trial In Sex Abuse Case

Originally published on Sat December 17, 2011 8:24 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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5:38am

Sun December 11, 2011
Politics

Arguing Over A Tax Cut Nobody Notices

Congress and the White House continue to debate the future of a 2-percent payroll tax cut that expires at the end of the year. While both Republicans and Democrats appear interested in extending the break, party leaders have been squabbling over details.

Democrats blocked a Republican proposal to tie an extension to speeding up approval of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline.

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