Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is based in Denver where he files reports on the energy industry as well as Western issues, politics and culture. He travels the country for NPR and spent many months covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

In 2006, Brady's reporting helped restart a federal car-titling system that had long been stymied by business interests. Once fully implemented, the Department of Justice estimates the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTS) will save U.S. car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He's also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter; and commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady discovered NPR in the late 1980s while running his small grocery store in Southern Oregon. "Customers often wanted to discuss current events. It was interesting, but I didn't know much. So I started reading the paper and listening to NPR to learn more," says Brady.

In 1989, he volunteered at the local NPR member station, Jefferson Public Radio, answering phones during a pledge drive and then running errands for the office staff until they let him in the newsroom.

Brady graduated from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University) in 1995 and has worked as a journalist since then.

If there’s a specific story you think Brady should consider covering, he can be reached on Facebook and Twitter, where he regularly posts stories related to his beats.

 

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10:01pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Business

Gas Drilling Boom Brings New Life To Steel Industry

Chapman Corp. is expanding to take advantage of extra business it expects to get in coming decades because of increasing production in the Marcellus Shale play.

Jeff Brady NPR

A natural gas drilling boom in Pennsylvania is helping the economies of Rust Belt cities long accustomed to bad news. Drilling requires steel — lots of it — and that has manufacturers expanding and hiring new workers.

While much attention has been paid to the environmental risks of drilling into the Marcellus Shale, the economic benefits have been less prominent in the national discussion. But in Youngstown, Ohio, locals have been watching an old industry come back to life.

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6:06am

Sun October 2, 2011
Around the Nation

Wall Street Protesters Plan Long-Term Occupation

A protester marches on Friday in New York City as part of larger demonstration focused on corporations, wealth and income distribution.
Mario Tama Getty Images

A protest in New York dubbed "Occupy Wall Street" appears to be settling in for the long term. Twice a day, protesters leave the tents, makeshift kitchen and free bookstore set up in Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan and begin a slow march down the sidewalk.

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1:00pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Around the Nation

Pa. May Change Electoral College Allocation Rules

Republican leaders in Pennsylvania's Legislature want to change how Electoral College votes in the state are allocated. Changing from a winner-takes-all system to a proportionate one based on congressional districts could help the GOP candidate gain a few extra votes in 2012. But the plan is controversial — even among Republicans.

6:00am

Sun September 4, 2011
NPR Story

Lee Lashes Gulf Coast

Tropical Storm Lee slogged on shore along the Gulf Coast Saturday, drenching Labor Day weekend plans and shutting down offshore oil rigs. Forecasters are warning that up to 20 inches of rain could fall in some places.

12:40pm

Wed August 31, 2011
Around the Nation

As Water Recedes, Clean Up Of A Soupy Mess Begins

Employees at Barber's Farm in Windburgh, N.Y. shovel muddy tomatoes left in the wake of flooding from Hurricane Irene.
Jeff Brady NPR

Much of the nation may have moved on from last week's hurricane, but about two million people are still without electricity in the northeast. And now that flood waters from Hurricane Irene have mostly receded, residents are shoveling muck from their houses.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo estimates damage in his state at about $1 billion.

"Over 600 homes destroyed. Six towns inundated. One hundred fifty major highways have been damaged. Twenty-two state bridges closed," reported Cuomo at a press conference.

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