Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is based in Denver where he files reports on the energy industry as well as Western issues, politics and culture. He travels the country for NPR and spent many months covering the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

In 2006, Brady's reporting helped restart a federal car-titling system that had long been stymied by business interests. Once fully implemented, the Department of Justice estimates the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTS) will save U.S. car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He's also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter; and commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady discovered NPR in the late 1980s while running his small grocery store in Southern Oregon. "Customers often wanted to discuss current events. It was interesting, but I didn't know much. So I started reading the paper and listening to NPR to learn more," says Brady.

In 1989, he volunteered at the local NPR member station, Jefferson Public Radio, answering phones during a pledge drive and then running errands for the office staff until they let him in the newsroom.

Brady graduated from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University) in 1995 and has worked as a journalist since then.

If there’s a specific story you think Brady should consider covering, he can be reached on Facebook and Twitter, where he regularly posts stories related to his beats.

 

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4:20am

Sat July 30, 2011
America's Mayors: Governing In Tough Times

In Tough Times, Philadelphia Bucks The Trend

Part 3 of a 6-part series

More than two years after the recession officially ended, mayors across the country are still struggling to balance their budgets.

Philadelphia avoided the big public employee layoffs seen in other cities by bucking national trends and doing what many consider unthinkable: raising taxes.

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7:50am

Sun July 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Same-Sex Couples Exchange Vows in New York

New York is now the sixth state, along with the District of Columbia, allowing same-sex marriages.

Across the Empire State, couples exchanged vows shortly after midnight. At Niagara Falls, gay marriage activists Kitty Lambert and Cheryle Rudd were wed in front of the rainbow-lit falls just a second or two after the clock struck 12.

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6:00am

Sun July 24, 2011
NPR Story

N.Y. Same-Sex Law Goes Into Effect

New York's same-sex marriage law went into effect at midnight. Moments after, Kitty Lambert and Cheryle Rudd exchanged vows in Niagara Falls.

12:01am

Wed July 13, 2011
Environment

As Focus On Fracking Sharpens, Fuel Worries Grow

Originally published on Wed July 13, 2011 8:38 am

A controversial technique for producing oil and natural gas called hydraulic fracturing — or fracking — has led to drilling booms from Texas to Pennsylvania in recent years. But there are concerns that it may be polluting drinking water.

As policymakers in Washington discuss how to make fracking safer, there is concern that fracking itself has become a distraction.

In the U.S., pretty much all of the oil and gas that was easy to get to is gone. Fracking makes it possible to extract petroleum from hard-to-reach places — say, a mile underground in dense layers of shale.

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4:00am

Fri June 24, 2011
Business

Obama Releases Oil Reserves To Counter Lost Crude

Originally published on Fri June 24, 2011 5:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And you can expect lower gas prices this summer. One reason: The White House is tapping the nation's Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Over the next month, the administration will sell 30 million barrels of government oil.

NPR's Jeff Brady has more.

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