Kathy Lohr

Whether covering the manhunt and eventual capture of Eric Robert Rudolph in the mountains of North Carolina, the remnants of the Oklahoma City federal building with its twisted metal frame and shattered glass, flood-ravaged Midwestern communities, or the terrorist bombings across the country, including the blast that exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta, correspondent Kathy Lohr has been at the heart of stories all across the nation.

Lohr was NPR's first reporter based in the Midwest. She opened NPR's St. Louis office in 1990 and the Atlanta bureau in 1996. Lohr covers the abortion issue on an ongoing basis for NPR, including political and legal aspects. She has often been sent into disasters as they are happening, to provide listeners with the intimate details about how these incidents affect people and their lives.

Lohr filed her first report for NPR while working for member station KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and began her journalism career in commercial television and radio as a reporter/anchor. Lohr also became involved in video production for national corporations and taught courses in television reporting and radio production at universities in Kansas and Missouri. She has filed reports for the NPR documentary program Horizons, the BBC, the CBC, Marketplace, and she was published in the Saturday Evening Post.

Lohr won the prestigious Missouri Medal of Honor for Excellence in Journalism in 2002. She received a fellowship from Vanderbilt University for work on the issue of domestic violence. Lohr has filed reports from 27 states and the District of Columbia. She has received other national awards for her coverage of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Midwestern floods of 1993, and for her reporting on ice storms in the Mississippi Delta. She has also received numerous awards for radio pieces on the local level prior to joining NPR's national team. Lohr was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. She now lives in her adopted hometown of Atlanta, covering stories across the southeastern part of the country.

 

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10:01pm

Thu September 1, 2011
Around the Nation

Georgia Jobs Program, Lauded By Obama, Has Critics

During his three-day bus tour, President Obama discussed job creation. At one town hall, he mentioned a training program in Georgia that allows companies to train prospective employees temporarily while they still receive an unemployment check.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

President Obama is scheduled next week to announce a new federal jobs plan that could include some kind of worker training program. Among those programs the president is considering is one in Georgia, which has had mixed reviews.

At a recent town hall meeting in Illinois, Obama answered questions about the sagging economy, and mentioned Georgia Works, a job-training program that allows a company to try out a prospective employee for eight weeks while the worker still receives an unemployment check. He called it a smart program.

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12:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

'Left Out': Post-Katrina Housing Battle Continues

Dorothy McClendon in Gulfport, Miss., hopes the state's latest housing program to help low-income residents will provide assistance so she can repair her moldy house.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

Six years ago Monday, Hurricane Katrina blew up the U.S. Gulf Coast, killed more than 1,800 people and left hundreds of thousands homeless. The story of the coast's recovery varies from place to place.

For some, life is back to normal. Along the Mississippi coast, thousands affected by Katrina still live in battered houses. They've been trapped by a technicality. Their homes were damaged by wind gusts rather than Katrina's storm surge.

In Biloxi, railroad tracks separate some of the neighborhoods that got the most help from those who got little or no aid.

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6:00am

Sun August 7, 2011
Around the Nation

In Tuscaloosa, A Commencement Comes A Year Late

This weekend, the University of Alabama will award degrees to students who would have received them last spring had a devastating tornado not postponed graduation. During ceremonies, the school will honor the six students killed in the storm. NPR's Kathy Lohr reports.

3:00am

Thu August 4, 2011
Business

The Economic Legacy Of Atlanta's Olympic Games

This Olympic Village housing for athletes taking part in the 1996 Centennial Olympics is located on the campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology.
AFP/Getty Images

Bringing the 1996 Summer Olympic Games to Atlanta was a long shot. Athens, Greece was the sentimental favorite to host the centennial games, and tension was palpable as IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch made the announcement back on September 18, 1990.

"The International Olympic Committee has awarded the 1996 Olympic Games to the city of ... Atlanta," Samaranch revealed.

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4:21am

Sat July 30, 2011
Reporter's Notebook

Olympic Triumph Amid Tragedy At 1996 Games

It's been 15 years since the Summer Olympics were held in Atlanta. NPR's Kathy Lohr covered the games and remembers how the Olympic spirit rose above the tragic bombing.

For me, two events still stand out from that summer.

First, the opening ceremony, which I covered from Centennial Olympic Park, where the festivities were broadcast for free on huge TV screens. It was a big party, and I stayed in the park for hours recording the event.

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