Kathy Lohr

Whether covering the manhunt and eventual capture of Eric Robert Rudolph in the mountains of North Carolina, the remnants of the Oklahoma City federal building with its twisted metal frame and shattered glass, flood-ravaged Midwestern communities, or the terrorist bombings across the country, including the blast that exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta, correspondent Kathy Lohr has been at the heart of stories all across the nation.

Lohr was NPR's first reporter based in the Midwest. She opened NPR's St. Louis office in 1990 and the Atlanta bureau in 1996. Lohr covers the abortion issue on an ongoing basis for NPR, including political and legal aspects. She has often been sent into disasters as they are happening, to provide listeners with the intimate details about how these incidents affect people and their lives.

Lohr filed her first report for NPR while working for member station KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and began her journalism career in commercial television and radio as a reporter/anchor. Lohr also became involved in video production for national corporations and taught courses in television reporting and radio production at universities in Kansas and Missouri. She has filed reports for the NPR documentary program Horizons, the BBC, the CBC, Marketplace, and she was published in the Saturday Evening Post.

Lohr won the prestigious Missouri Medal of Honor for Excellence in Journalism in 2002. She received a fellowship from Vanderbilt University for work on the issue of domestic violence. Lohr has filed reports from 27 states and the District of Columbia. She has received other national awards for her coverage of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Midwestern floods of 1993, and for her reporting on ice storms in the Mississippi Delta. She has also received numerous awards for radio pieces on the local level prior to joining NPR's national team. Lohr was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. She now lives in her adopted hometown of Atlanta, covering stories across the southeastern part of the country.

 

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6:47am

Tue July 19, 2011
Around the Nation

Camp Fosters Love For Space Program

Space camp began in 1982, the year after the shuttle first flew. The camp started out small but more than half a million students have graduated from the program. The U.S. Space and Rocket Center, which runs the camp, is building a new simulator to mirror NASA's goals to travel to the Moon, Mars and into deep space.

3:21pm

Wed June 29, 2011
Books

At 75, 'Gone With The Wind' Marks Yet 'Another Day'

Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind marks its 75th anniversary on Thursday. A 1936 promotional poster for the book shows heroine Scarlett O'Hara running through the streets as Atlanta burns.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

As a child growing up just south of Atlanta, Margaret Mitchell used to sit on the front porch, listening to adults tell stories about the Civil War as they passed still summer nights in Clayton County. Those stories went on to help inspire one of the most famous novels of all time — Gone with the Wind, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary.

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4:18pm

Thu June 9, 2011
Business

Union Workers Cry Foul Over New S.C. Boeing Plant

Originally published on Thu June 9, 2011 8:11 pm

Construction crews work to finish Boeing's new 787 Dreamliner assembly plant in North Charleston, S.C. The company plans to start assembling planes here in July and will provide 1,000 nonunion jobs.
Boeing

A new Boeing plant in South Carolina is the subject of a legal battle that's playing out across the South and in Congress.

The controversy is over Boeing's decision to assemble its fuel-efficient 787 Dreamliner in nonunion South Carolina instead of in Washington state, where it has built planes for decades.

The company says South Carolina offered a lot of incentives to get the plant, but the union says Boeing broke the law and violated workers' rights.

Plant Timeline Not Affected

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4:12pm

Tue May 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Unabomber's Criminal Collectibles Up For Auction

In June of 1995, Kaczynski sent his manifesto, "Industrial Society and its Future," to The New York Times and The Washington Post, threatening to mail more bombs if the papers didn't publish the manuscript. After much debate — and an FBI recommendation — they published.
U.S. Marshals Office of Public Affairs Flickr

The federal government is holding an unusual auction. It's selling the possessions of criminal mastermind Ted Kaczynski, better known as the Unabomber. He made bombs in a remote cabin in Montana and sent them across the country targeting scientists, computers and airplanes.

Kaczynski's bombs killed three people and injured dozens. Now officials are selling his property online.

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4:06pm

Mon May 23, 2011
Law

Georgia Farmers Brace For New Immigration Law

Migrant workers hand pick Vidalia onions in Georgia. The vegetable is too delicate to be harvested with machines.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Georgia is putting in place a new law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigrants, and many across the state are nervous. Businesses fear an economic boycott, the Latino community fears police officers will abuse their new powers and farmers in South Georgia fear the law will hurt them dramatically.

Georgia is known for its peaches and Vidalia onions, the state vegetable. The specialty crop is produced in just a few counties in the rural southeast part of the state, where the soil is just right.

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